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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Afternoon everyone.

Clutch went as I pulled off a dual carriageway onto a slip road. Van is now stuck on the drive.

Can anyone recommend a York mechanic / garage?

Has anyone ever used a mobile clutch replacement service?

Thanks for looking
Gary
 

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It's extremely rare for a clutch to suddenly go pal. Are you sure it's the clutch & not gear linkages or clutch hydraulics?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's extremely rare for a clutch to suddenly go pal. Are you sure it's the clutch & not gear linkages or clutch hydraulics?
Thanks for responding - much appreciated.

I honestly wouldn't know as I'm not mechanically minded.

I was aware that the clutch was slipping slightly and it had been for a while, but not causing any major loss of acceleration.

What happened - I drove up the slip road, got to the roundabout at the top, put the clutch to the floor and it stayed on the floor. I hooked the clutch pedal back up with my foot and then depressed it again, managing to get the van into first gear and move off. I then got second gear and cruised to a safe place to stop.

Once stopped I gave it ten mins and tried starting again and got the van into first, then second gear and attempted to drive home which was only a couple of miles along country roads. When I got to a T junction the same thing happened again, so I waited for recovery.

Does that help with diagnosis mate?
 

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Thanks for responding - much appreciated.

I honestly wouldn't know as I'm not mechanically minded.

I was aware that the clutch was slipping slightly and it had been for a while, but not causing any major loss of acceleration.

What happened - I drove up the slip road, got to the roundabout at the top, put the clutch to the floor and it stayed on the floor. I hooked the clutch pedal back up with my foot and then depressed it again, managing to get the van into first gear and move off. I then got second gear and cruised to a safe place to stop.

Once stopped I gave it ten mins and tried starting again and got the van into first, then second gear and attempted to drive home which was only a couple of miles along country roads. When I got to a T junction the same thing happened again, so I waited for recovery.

Does that help with diagnosis mate?
Sounds to me like the hydraulics pal. Have a look under the steering wheel where your clutch pedal pivot is.
Press the clutch down with your hand to see if there is any movement in the pedal box bracket that holds the clutch master cylinder. Look for leaks of fluid too. It's a common fault. If it's not that it is likely to be the clutch slave either on or in the gearbox bell housing. Depending on which type of gearbox type you have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Van is a 2.5TDi

There's a leak of some type of fluid under the engine - obviously related to whatever has happened.

I'll get the steering column shroud off in the morning and check.

What would be the fault and is it relatively easy to fix (by me?) - or a job for a mechanic?
 

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Van is a 2.5TDi

There's a leak of some type of fluid under the engine - obviously related to whatever has happened.

I'll get the steering column shroud off in the morning and check.

What would be the fault and is it relatively easy to fix (by me?) - or a job for a mechanic?
No need to take the shroud off pal. If the leak is external it is more than likely you clutch slave cylinder.
Do you know what gearbox you have? If reverse gear is down, left then forward you have the VW box.
It's relatively easy but you will have to bleed the system after replacing the slave.
 

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Reverse is down, right then back.
You have the 102hp ACV engine. That is an internal slave & the gearbox would have to come off.
Best get it to a mechanic mate because it's a big job. I'd also change the clutch & clutch release bearing whilst you're on.
Make sure they check that clutch pivot & master cylinder first though. That would save you a lot of money if it's that.
 

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If you run your finger along the damp bit under the engine, then touch the tip of your tongue with the same finger (it wont kill you) I suspect it will be bitter to taste, if so that is brake fluid and it will be the concentric slave that is leaking into the bell housing and eventually onto the road. Next check the brake fluid reservoir, the clutch feed is from about half way down and as such, when it gets down to half you will get troubles.
Those concentric slave cylinders are getting more and more common and are an invention that diddnt need inventing.
 

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The concentric slave cylinder is a great invention that save manufacturing costs, makes things simpler and gives a better clutch pedal feel. It is unfortunate though when you lose the part failure lottery and have to pay all that money to replace such a relatively cheap part. Although T4_Gary I can see you've chipped that beast to 155BHP so you can expect more maintenance costs - though the release bearing shouldn't fail early unless you've got an uprated clutch that puts more strain on it.

My father in law had a Volvo S80 where the release bearing went, had to pay a grand to get it fixed as 'it's false economy to not replace the clutch and flywheel too'. Poor bugger wrote it off less than a year later.
 

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Sorry but I have to disagree, putting an item that is prone to failing (and lots do) inside the bell housing is a bad decision. Its the same with dual mass flywheels, they were put in to take vibration out and back in the day, nobody complained of vibration. Now when you change a clutch, you have to do the flywheel too as you know with a new clutch on, the old one would fail rapidl. Untill the days of dual mass flywheel, I can honestly say that I never replaced a flywheel when doing a clutch.
 

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Having replaced the clutch on a 2.5 ACV on the drive it is not for the faint hearted. Replaced the clutch, flywheel and slave cylinder. Got to agree fitting hydraulic stuff in the gearbox is a pain. Bleeding the clutch from memory there are two bleed nipples, one on the slave and the second on the bulkhead.
 

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I've written this before......

With practice, you don't NEED a clutch.

I drove around 150 miles in a Landie with the clutch pedal on the floor, full of furniture, and a trailer on the back!

Engine off, 1st gear, start....off you go.
Judge the revs (feel the pressure on the gearlever), get into 2nd.....and so on.
Going down, take out of (say) 4th, rev the engine, and slot it into 3rd.....etc, etc.

ONLY problem is stopping and starting.....
To stop, take out of gear, engine off.
To start, into 1st, crank the engine.

I've practiced this technique with EVERY vehicle I've owned since I was 15 (The Moggy Minor I bought didn't HAVE a pedal, just the "stem" sticking through the floor!)
That was almost 40 years ago, but since then I've "tested" it on the 20 or more vehicles I've owned.

It's only the same as "double de-clutching" that everyone had to do before syncro was invented.....but without using the middle pedal! :ROFLMAO:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I've written this before......

With practice, you don't NEED a clutch.

I drove around 150 miles in a Landie with the clutch pedal on the floor, full of furniture, and a trailer on the back!

Engine off, 1st gear, start....off you go.
Judge the revs (feel the pressure on the gearlever), get into 2nd.....and so on.
Going down, take out of (say) 4th, rev the engine, and slot it into 3rd.....etc, etc.

ONLY problem is stopping and starting.....
To stop, take out of gear, engine off.
To start, into 1st, crank the engine.

I've practiced this technique with EVERY vehicle I've owned since I was 15 (The Moggy Minor I bought didn't HAVE a pedal, just the "stem" sticking through the floor!)
That was almost 40 years ago, but since then I've "tested" it on the 20 or more vehicles I've owned.

It's only the same as "double de-clutching" that everyone had to do before syncro was invented.....but without using the middle pedal! :ROFLMAO:
🤣 Think I'll just get it fixed!
 

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Cant the garage doing the job get a clutch etc, should all be available from their local factors in LUK.
 

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I've written this before......

With practice, you don't NEED a clutch.

I drove around 150 miles in a Landie with the clutch pedal on the floor, full of furniture, and a trailer on the back!

Engine off, 1st gear, start....off you go.
Judge the revs (feel the pressure on the gearlever), get into 2nd.....and so on.
Going down, take out of (say) 4th, rev the engine, and slot it into 3rd.....etc, etc.

ONLY problem is stopping and starting.....
To stop, take out of gear, engine off.
To start, into 1st, crank the engine.

I've practiced this technique with EVERY vehicle I've owned since I was 15 (The Moggy Minor I bought didn't HAVE a pedal, just the "stem" sticking through the floor!)
That was almost 40 years ago, but since then I've "tested" it on the 20 or more vehicles I've owned.

It's only the same as "double de-clutching" that everyone had to do before syncro was invented.....but without using the middle pedal! :ROFLMAO:
My driving instructor taught me to change gear without using the clutch. I didn't believe him so he made me do it.
It might be a tight Yorkshire thing though, just in case your clutch goes. :LOL:
 
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