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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Looking for insights!
Ok so yesterday set about changing the timing belt (T4 ABL 1.9TD (2000)), replacing water pump and all round new belts. So all in all everything went fine with no major difficulties (even that little bolt by the water pump for holding the bottom cover on that has no way to get to it from behind without dismantling half the motor should it fall out, you gotta love VW for hiding bolts behind things!), Didn't touch the toothed crankshaft sprocket, new belt on, tensioned and timing checked and double checked and triple checked, all good. new water pump fitted, all pulleys back on, all bolts tightened to the corrrect torque, all new belts on and tensioned, crossed fingers and started the motor, brilliant, all running well, no squeaks, no wobbles, no knocking sounds, and managed to get everything cleared and tidied up from the street, (where, alas, is where I have to do my repairs etc.) before it got too dark to see...All in all feeling pretty chuffed with myself.

Except...a slight uneasiness about something....
The auxiliary/power steering pump pulleys and the four bolts holding it onto the crankshaft.
As I set about refitting it to the crank sprocket it didn't seem to want to slot on so easy as I expected and initially had trouble lining up the bolts, took it off again and on closer inspection (I'm laid on my back under the van on the side of the street) I noticed a very small protrusion on the crank sprocket, realised that that must have to line up with one of the extra holes on the pulleys,, so managed to get it in a position and hold it and get the bolts in, all seemed fine and set about slowly cranking the bolts up in a circular sequence to pull everything into place, at a particular moment I began to think this doesn't feel quite right, these bolts don't seem to be cranking up tight, at which point I remembered reading somewhere that they could possibly be stretch bolts, so got the torque wrench on them and realised I was over tightening them, even though they didn't feel as though they were excessively tight, slackened off a little and set to the correct torque.
Now I'm wondering if maybe I should have replaced these four bolts with new bolts, I've already had the engine running, not yet with high revs, everything thing looks and sounds good and can't see any wobbles anywhere, but I'm just slightly uneasy about it.

I haven't yet been back under the van to have a second look and check, and I'm wondering if the more experienced among you on the forum can give me any suggestions, insights etc. etc. Did I miss something?...should I have done something differently, should I not be worrying even!...Anything would be much appreciated!
 

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They are not very tight, 25nm I think. Also not stretch bolts, according to my Haynes manual anyway..
I've reused them on a few TB changes. I think people replace them because the heads tend to rust out and round off the Allen head.
If your worried they won't hold maybe replace one at a time adding a bit of thread lock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They are not very tight, 25nm I think. Also not stretch bolts, according to my Haynes manual anyway..
I've reused them on a few TB changes. I think people replace them because the heads tend to rust out and round off the Allen head.
If your worried they won't hold maybe replace one at a time adding a bit of thread lock.

Hey thanks for your input, yes no mention of stretch bolts in the Haynes manual.
What has me puzzled is that you expect at a certain point to feel as you're tightening the bolts that moment of resistance as the two surfaces meet and then it's time to get the torque wrench on it, but that's not what it felt like, it just seemed to feel like the bolts would keep turning. Now I have been seeing something about the two pulleys possibly being rubber bonded, I'm wondering if that could be the reason, that it was the rubber compressing gave the feeling the surfaces hadn't mated?

Something else aswel, the timing belt, no sign at all of any arrows for direction of rotation??? I inspected every centimeter and couldn't find anything that even looked like an arrow >>>>>!!..a Gates Power Grip??, bi-directional or not?
 

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Well, the Haynes Manual isn't worth the re-cycled toilet paper it's written on ! (Nothing like they used to be.)
As for the direction issue....ask Gates.
I would assume NOT......but you never know.
 

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The camshaft sprocket is exactly the width of the belt - it could be the belt was 1mm or so offset until you put the pulley on, which pushed it home onto the sprocket via the bolts. that would give the rubbery feel you describe.

As T4Tobe says it's good practice to replace those four bolts anyway... those allen heads round off if you so much as look at them funny. Use high quality tight fitting allen bits!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Well, the Haynes Manual isn't worth the re-cycled toilet paper it's written on ! (Nothing like they used to be.)

With you on that!..late '70s early '80s an American concern took Haynes over, never been the same since!

As for the direction issue....ask Gates.
I would assume NOT......but you never know.

Yes, pretty obvious I guess. (I feel so dumb sometimes!..: :rolleyes:)
Mmm... more investigating needed!

Cheers for the input!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The camshaft sprocket is exactly the width of the belt - it could be the belt was 1mm or so offset until you put the pulley on, which pushed it home onto the sprocket via the bolts. that would give the rubbery feel you describe.

Ok thanks, something to consider, a re-check on the pulleys and bolts, would have expected though with the three full cycles of checking the timing would have set that true,

As T4Tobe says it's good practice to replace those four bolts anyway... those allen heads round off if you so much as look at them funny. Use high quality tight fitting allen bits!

All in all I was suprised with the condition of all the bolts, everything went smooth, yes good quality bits used all round, but will be taking T4tobe's advice and replace the bolts!

Thanks for the input.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well, the Haynes Manual isn't worth the re-cycled toilet paper it's written on ! (Nothing like they used to be.)
As for the direction issue....ask Gates.
I would assume NOT......but you never know.

Found on Gates webpage.....

The timing belt: follow the arrows?

From a purely technical point of view, a new timing belt is completely symmetrical, meaning it does not have a direction of rotation. “Then what’s the use of timing belts with directional arrows?”, we hear you wonder. If your new timing belt has timing marks, then there are similar marks on the pulleys/on the engine. The directional arrows are only there to help you line up the timing marks, and it’s by no means obligatory to use them, because – as we’ve said before – a new timing belt can operate in either direction.

Question answered so it seems!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, the conclusion.
So I crawled back under the camper and re-examined the bolts, decided, contrary to what T4Tobe suggested, that the 4 bolts are in such a good condition, ie no rust or signs of wear, that replacing them wasn't necessary.
I removed them one at a time and added a couple drops of locktight and cranked them back up to the recommended 25nm torque, all seems apparently fine, I believe I'm well satisfied with the results. no wobbles, squeaks or rattles. All running smoothly.....(y)
all that's left is to thank you guys for your input!
Here's to happy travels!...(when this damn covid has ****** off!)


(ah, automated censoring, apologies to the admins)
 
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