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Discussion Starter #1
I have these factory fitted alloys on my T4.



I have lost a spigot ring on one wheel. Does anyone happen to know the standard size?

Sorry I am being lazy, I know I should just measure one of the other ones. Just thought somebody might know!

Got a vibration at 50mph, it may just be the wheel not quite on 100% straight.
 

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sc vw customs 1.9tdi convert
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I have these factory fitted alloys on my T4.



I have lost a spigot ring on one wheel. Does anyone happen to know the standard size?

Sorry I am being lazy, I know I should just measure one of the other ones. Just thought somebody might know!

Got a vibration at 50mph, it may just be the wheel not quite on 100% straight.
if they are factory fit and 5x112 why do they need spigots...57.1 is the centre bore size..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The other three wheels have chamfered spigot rings on them. It is a ball ache to get the wheel on without them.
 

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They may have been machined out to fit another vehicle in the past, but if they are factory fit alloys as others have said they won't need spigot rings
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Good to know. Maybe they are not genuine then or like you say have been adapted. When it stops peeing down I will take the back wheels off and measure and have a look to see if they look like they have been altered.
 

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Without wishing you to panic, wheel bolts are only designed to pull the wheel tight onto the hub NOT take the weight of the van!

Best get it sorted ASAP if you are still driving it mate T:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Driven 16k miles with it like that since i got the van last year. :eek:

Only have surfboards in the back and a bit of plywood so not too bad but will get it sorted as soon as the biblical rain stops.
 

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I think you will find he is righ, the bolts hold the wheel on the hub takes the weightT:
He isnt mate
If that was the case there wouldnt be plastic spigots on loads of after market rims ,
All the spigots do is centralize the wheel
The bolts mainly hold the weight and the friction between wheel and hub T:
Some manufacturers dont even have spiggots on some models of old , VW being one of them T:
Im not saying dont fit spigots as by centralizing the wheel they stop vibrations that can cause bolts to loosen etc but hold the weight of the vehicle no.
 

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He isnt mate
If that was the case there wouldnt be plastic spigots on loads of after market rims ,
All the spigots do is centralize the wheel
The bolts mainly hold the weight and the friction between wheel and hub T:
Some manufacturers dont even have spiggots on some models of old , VW being one of them T:
Im not saying dont fit spigots as by centralizing the wheel they stop vibrations that can cause bolts to loosen etc but hold the weight of the vehicle no.
This is what Ronal Wheels USA had to say about hub centricity...

"Hubcentric" is another term that is often not mentioned or is misunderstood. A hubcentric wheel is a wheel designed with a centerbore opening to match the exact diameter of the hub of a specific vehicle. The importance is that the weight bearing of the wheel, in reference to the vehicle, is accomplished by the hub and centerbore mating to an exact fit. The lug nuts/bolts' only purpose is to affix the wheel to the mounting surface, not to bear the weight of the vehicle. Often wheels that are not hubcentric create driveability problems--shimmy, vibration, and erratic tracking. Many quality manufacturers design their wheels to be versatile by providing hubcentric centering rings that snap into place inside the wheel, to make the wheel hubcentric. This is an important safety issue--hubcentricity is highly recommended.

Plastic or nylon is also incredibly strong, in compression.
 

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The studs provide the clamping force, the friction reacts the loads. The hub is there for centreing only. It may react to some exceptional forces like a kerb hit but that would be exceptional and still very unlikely to move

If the spigot worked with normal loads then you would see fretting, since it is a clearance fit and not an interference fit ,
if it was an interference fit that might be a different matter or even a tapered hub centre but there not .

To quote a piece from your ronal USA piece " A hubcentric wheel is a wheel designed with a centerbore opening to match the exact diameter of the hub of a specific vehicle." its not its a clearance fit so not an exact match .

Bit of tech for you ,
Did you know an average wheel bolt at 14mm thread bolt done upto 122nm will produce a clamp pressure of around 4100kg on average
thats 1 bolt put 5 on a wheel and you can see the hub face to wheel face interference friction is pretty damn high and more than enough to support a vehicle and its forces


We are not going to agree on this and im not willing to fall out over it T:
we both believe what we believe in
chow for now :)
 

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The studs provide the clamping force, the friction reacts the loads. The hub is there for centreing only. It may react to some exceptional forces like a kerb hit but that would be exceptional and still very unlikely to move

If the spigot worked with normal loads then you would see fretting, since it is a clearance fit and not an interference fit ,
if it was an interference fit that might be a different matter or even a tapered hub centre but there not .

To quote a piece from your ronal USA piece " A hubcentric wheel is a wheel designed with a centerbore opening to match the exact diameter of the hub of a specific vehicle." its not its a clearance fit so not an exact match .

Bit of tech for you ,
Did you know an average wheel bolt at 14mm thread bolt done upto 122nm will produce a clamp pressure of around 4100kg on average
thats 1 bolt put 5 on a wheel and you can see the hub face to wheel face interference friction is pretty damn high and more than enough to support a vehicle and its forces


We are not going to agree on this and im not willing to fall out over it T:
we both believe what we believe in
chow for now :)
no intention of arguing with you and I know you have a greater expertise on vehicles than I have, it's just that I had a wheel come off at 70mph that had been torqued correctly, but didn't have spigot rings. I have tried to research as much as possible for the reasons.
I now check the torque on my wheels weekly and my torque wrench is always in my van, so for me regardless of whether spigot rings are required or not, I will always use them and recommend for everyone else to use them.T:

Have a great xmas*<:)>
 

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no intention of arguing with you and I know you have a greater expertise on vehicles than I have, it's just that I had a wheel come off at 70mph that had been torqued correctly, but didn't have spigot rings. I have tried to research as much as possible for the reasons.
I now check the torque on my wheels weekly and my torque wrench is always in my van, so for me regardless of whether spigot rings are required or not, I will always use them and recommend for everyone else to use them.T:

Have a great xmas*<:)>
Hi
I totally agree as i said in earlier posts there no way if the vehicle was designed to have spiggots you should run without them purely as theres no way you can centre the wheel accurate enough on the hubs without having some sort of throw in the wheel
Being uncentralised is probably what caused the bolts to come adrift with you .

Merry christmas :)
 
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