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Hi - I have a 2012 T5 conversion which is new to us in the past few months, this is our first van (which we love) so it's all a bit new to me!!

The Van Battery is clearly faulty it's starting ok, but anything left on for even a short time left it dead, and I've had to jump start using a starter pack I have. Alternator is charging, but I can see voltage dropping when left off.

I have a leisure battery with a split charge relay (I think that's the correct terminology!!). I've noticed this battery sulphating with the relay clicking on and off recently when driving. This battery is new and seems to be working ok.

I think the failing car battery might be the issue for this, as the voltage misalignment between the van battery and leisure is causing constant charging, and causing issues for the relay. I will be replacing the van battery in the next day or so as it's clearly knackered, but does this sound reasonable that this battery would be impacting the Leisure in this way, and hopefully might rectify.

Cheers

Ross
 

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Yes, it sounds quite likely if the engine battery is in a really bad way.

My advice would be not to run the van at all until the battery is replaced, because if it's badly damaged internally it may be putting a very heavy load on the alternator.

I would strongly recommend that you do not jump-start, especially with a suspected failed battery. We have had too many accounts here of failed control modules (especially ABS controllers) immediately after people have jump-started. You may get away with it, but the cost to fix is so great that you probably won't want to take the risk.
 

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Yes, it sounds quite likely if the engine battery is in a really bad way.

My advice would be not to run the van at all until the battery is replaced, because if it's badly damaged internally it may be putting a very heavy load on the alternator.

I would strongly recommend that you do not jump-start, especially with a suspected failed battery. We have had too many accounts here of failed control modules (especially ABS controllers) immediately after people have jump-started. You may get away with it, but the cost to fix is so great that you probably won't want to take the risk.
Hi, just to clarify, for my own reference.
Do you mean don't jump start (jump leads) or don't bump start (push)?
 

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If you can, avoid jump starting with jump leads, because of the big changes in supply voltage on the electrics (generally whatever you use to do the job will have to be trying to recharge a knackered battery and turning over the engine at the same time). Bump starting should not involve any significant voltage transients, though of course it won't be possible on an auto...
 
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