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Discussion Starter #1
I've been asking around for a while now about what the best way to repaint the van will be.
Reason no one will say for sure is because there isn't an answer.
The 'best' way is to hand it over to a specialist who will carefully remove all the fittings, seals, windows, everything, repair all the dents and rust, carefully and skillfully prep the surfaces, mask and paint in a dedicated environment with specialist tools, employing techniques garnered over years of experience.
There is absolutely no way you will get that sort of treatment for anything less than three grand, and for that price they're still not going to fuss too much.
In that case the 'best' way is the roller-job, but the fact remains that the final quality will be dictated by the amount of prep you put in and the care you take in the actual painting. I thought that rollering sounded ideal over those big flat areas but there's lots and lots of nooks, crannies and creases to contend with.
Given that a paint job is unlikely to put three grands worth of value on the van, a £1k external only job probably makes more sense, unless you're me.
There is going to be a lot of metalwork visible on the inside, but also, I've seen a few paint jobs recently, and (no disrespect to any of the owners) i just can't bear to have little riglets of yellow peeping out at me everytime i open a door, i want it to look quality, i also want all the rust and dents treating and i want whoever does it to care enough that they will fix any other issues that become apparent when the vehicle is stripped.
So, the solution is a 'proper' home job, I don't have a vacuum sealed dust free facility, I don't have years of hard earned experience, but i do have access to a dusty garage that's not really tall enough and i did have a go at respaying a mondeo bumper for my dad recently.
So, all set then.

Costs:

Paint, Thinners, Clear-coat, Sandpaper, Wirewool, Tac cloths, Scouring pads, body filler, filler primer, rust remedy, wire brush, masking tape, masking paper, etc, etc..

£300 and counting

2nd hand compressor + spray gun

£200

A guy to remove and refit the glass

£220 inc replacing 2 seals.

(I'm sure I've spent more than that)

On with the manual labour...


Step 1, Strip it.



Step 2, discover loads of stuff that you know nothing about, like the immobiliser, or weren't expecting, like this garden.



Step 3, clean it.



Step 4, sand it.



Step 4.1, keep sanding and sanding for days and days. At this point i was about 6 days in to the total project, not regular 8 hour days either, the occasional interruptions of gainful employment were providing welcome respite from the incessant rubbing of nooks and crannies.

Step 4.2, enlist the help of some pensioners, they ain't the fastest, but they'll wotk for biscuits.



Unless they have been watching The Godfather, then they might be prone to effing around with orange peel teeth instead.



Step 5, Whilst said pensioners are finishing the sanding, get to work on the rust and dents.

Step 6, wash the dust off with a soapy sponge.



Step 7, mask it.



Step 8, paint it - Horay, at last!








So this is where I'm at. 8 full days of labour into the job and i only started putting the paint on yesterday afternoon. It's not a complaint, i knew i wouldn't sand it in a day, its more of a 'heads up'. I haven't done a perfect job in that time either i honestly feel like i could spend 6 months tinkering around

i had to stop this afternoon because i ran out of thinners so i have an enforced break this evening, hence my starting this thread. Maybe the next update will be the finished product, maybe I'll be starting a thread in a couple of days entitled something like "HELP, How do i put such and such back together?"
Either way i'll be back soon.

B
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm too tired to be overly verbose, but three days (of work) later and i think it's painted. No. It's painted. It's laqured. That's it. I'm really happy with the finish, i just hope that it lasts, it's going to spend the next three days, untouched in a warm(ish) garage and then, hopefully it will be tough enough to handle having me working around it. Please, please, please can i somehow manage to put it back together without scratching it, and please can it look nice and even when i get it out into the daylight and please can it prove to be tough and durable and last for years and years. amen. time for bed.

 

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Thats good work, i wouldn't be brave enough to take on a project as big as that. Looking forward to the finished product.
Good effort.T:T:T::ILU:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I went back to the van yesterday, I put the wheels back on and got it out into the daylight. It looked great and i was feeling happy but as i started putting locks etc back on i was getting some alarming little flakes coming off. So i started poking around in little tester places.
Now lets be clear here, I did not scrimp on the prep, every single surface of the van was sanded at least once and several times on exposed external areas, then de-greased with soapy water, then de-greased again with petrol, then finally tack-ragged before painting. The areas most prone to a bit of flaking were parts like the beaded inner seams of doors, which may actually be Stikaflex rather than metal, but they, like the other metalwork only had the upper layers of paint taken off, so there is no reason why they wouldn't take as well as the other, metal panels.
So i was a bit gutted.
In the end i decided to clean it down again and give the whole van another lacquering, i had enough for just over 2 coats left so i sprayed all that on, then got an electric radiator and put that inside the van.
So it's going to sit there all week with the radiator on and hopefully this is the best chance i can give it to form a nice durable finish.
I'm praying that it's not just too late. I did plenty of research and I took the best advice i could get. I just can't help feeling that some sort of primer might have helped with adhesion, even though no-one suggested that i might need it, including the supplier that was keen to sell me everything going.
I've now used 3 litres of lacquer on the van, about 4 - 6 coats (i put more on the bonnet and wings, less on the internal beams) I will happily get another 3 litres and put all that on too if it's going to make a difference, i just wonder if it will.

:(
 

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As long as the petrol did not leave any residue afterwards.

You might have left some dust around the areas that were flaking as that way the paint might have not taken to the bodywork.

I am currently respraying my van and we used panel wipe. which removes all grease or dirt from the panels. Not heard of anyone using petrol before, but i am no paint expert.

I have stopped with my paint job at the moment as it has been to cold to be spraying in a cold garage. Once the temperature gets back up again I will be carrying on with the spray job.

Post some pics up of the finished job!! Would be great to see it.

Wish i had a double garage though.
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How long after you painted it did you laquer it, I normally try to get it laquered the same day, as soon as the base coat has dried, this helps adhesion of the laquer.
If its left for days before laquer is layed on then it can lead to flaking.
How has the laquer come out, did you thin the last coat down quite a lot, as this helps avoid orange peel effect, but its a fine line between thinned just right and too thin to the point where you get runs.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
ive known petrol to be used years ago when i worked in a paint shop,
did you say you dident prime it ?:ILU::ILU::cool:
yep. Didn't prime it. I painted straight onto the old, well sanded paintwork. I didn't even consider priming it - never asked the question :( I'm sure that would have helped a lot.
It's too late now though, the question is whether i leave it the way it is or get another 2 litres of lacquer and lacquer the eff out of it. I'm leaning towards the latter.

B.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
How long after you painted it did you laquer it, I normally try to get it laquered the same day, as soon as the base coat has dried, this helps adhesion of the laquer.
If its left for days before laquer is layed on then it can lead to flaking.
How has the laquer come out, did you thin the last coat down quite a lot, as this helps avoid orange peel effect, but its a fine line between thinned just right and too thin to the point where you get runs.
I lacquered it the next day, the issue is not with the lacquer flaking from the new paint but with all the new paint and lacquer flaking from the old. However it does make me worry, cos it's now been in a warm garage for a week, and as i say above, I'm considering laying down another 4 or 5 coats on top - i don't want to create any more issues. maybe i should just leave it be now and resign myself to touching up any bits that haven't taken properly. I may be over-reacting, i may just have to accept that re-finishing is never going to be as resilient the original paintwork. Actually, i have always accepted that fact, i just expected it to be harder than it appears to be. maybe it's just taking a long time to harden properly, it has been cold after all, in spite of my efforts to keep the place warm.

hmm. what do you all reckon? leave it be or lacquer the hell out of it?

B.
 

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what type of paint did you use 2 pack,celluose ? If there is a problem with the paint underneath then more and more laquer won't solve it.
2 pack dries due to the hardener and should be touch dry in a couple of hours. celluose will take a lot longer.
As long as the original paint was fine, then its common practice to give this a rub over and paint straight over the top, no need to primer, although any repairs that have been fillered need to be primed.
If i ever have to paint anything that i'm not sure of (paint thats already on), i always spray a coat of uniblock first, this wont react with the paint thats on there but ensures you have no reaction with the new paint your putting on, it adds to the cost but is better that getting a bad reaction and having to do it all again.

Also just noticed in one of your posts, you say you sanded everything, then degreased.......did you panelwipe (degrease) before sanding as well ? if not then when you sanded, you would have been sanding any wax etc further into the existing paint. you should wash the van then panelwipe everything well, then flat the paint back, then panelwipe again, and then just before you paint to make sure the panel is really clean and free of debris.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
First thing i did was wash the whole vehicle down with a jetwash of water and washing-up liquid. I gave it a really thorough clean, the jetwash was so powerful it took any loose paint and rust off with it. Then i started sanding. The paint i used was single pack basecoat and it went on without any apparent reaction anywhere.
I'm feeling quite reassured by your advice, as it makes sense that the little tester areas that i have neen scratching are areas that did not get as thorough treatment at most stages, due to the fact that they were awkward and largely unseen. For example, the inner lip of the wing, right next to the engine bay. The new paint here will, in small places, rub off with a vigourous cloth-rubbing. This scared me, as i obviously don't want this to happen on significant and visible areas the first time i come to clean it, or if someone/thing rubs up against the van.
Hopefully then, i have not missed any critical stages and have, as i attemped, done the process correctly. Hopefully the evidence of poor adhesion in localised spots just goes to emphasise the importance of thouroughly cleaning, sanding and degreasing and all i have to worry about is a bit of re-touching in a few spots later down the line.

Thanks. Feeling a bit happier now. :)

I'm still tempted to a bit more lacquer on. As I've got a few bits to return, so i've got some credit to spend. The bonnet, wings, doors and sills have had about 5 or 6 coats the main body about 4, the roof about 3 and the interior beams and wheel arches have only had about 2.

Thanks for your comments and advice.

B.
 

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Hi there mate, when you are putting more laquer on, are you rescotching the laquer you have previously put on? We use a grey scotch pad that will scratch the surface up with small scratches that the laquer covers very easily, this way the laquer has got something to key to. What colour is it by the way? It looks a great out the gun finish by the way A:
 
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