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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just planning ahead, as the van i am looking at doesn't come with a RnR bed, the layout at the mo will be fine for us for now but the wife wants a second sprog and at that point we will need a rnr bed with seat belts, and the only option is one which has had a seat belt anchorage pull test (my day job is witnessing testing like SBA tests and issuing European approvals) however my question is how d te approved RnR beds actually secure into the van? As the few sites I have looked on say they are tested it make no mention of how to actually fit them? Ie bolted direct to the floor? On tracking? And if so which tracking? And how is that trackin fitted to the van? As I have seen tracking fail before due to not enough bolts and bolts through the van floor with no spreaders on the other side etc..

Any one have any pics or fitting instructions for a bed they have fitted?

Cheers

Karl
 

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some info in technical section

http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=32918

my T4 'velle rear 3 seat ( not a bed seat as per multivan ) is held in with 4 bolts to plates under the van, but where the seat belts mount to the body sides ( more info in technical section about this ) but I don't know if those 4 bolts would be sufficient for seat and belt mounts

cant comment on the rails for Multivan / later T4's I'm afraid
 

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On t4's we (smartbeds) have a big spreader plate on the back and more on the front, can't remember sizes off hand but roughly 500x200x6mm so pretty substantial

Feel free to drop us an email and I can provide a picture if you wanted :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Tom,

A few pics etc of the spreader plate and fitting would be interesting, I have looked at the cert for a couple of beds and they say tested on a solid metal base... Has anyone actually done a test in van?? For busses the seats are approved, and then the instal is also tested and approved to make sure the fitting is ok... Tested seats are no good if the whole lot just comes out in a crash!
 

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Most beds out there are pull tested on a solid platform. I wouldn't imagine there are many in van tests don't in t4's these days, as the maket for t5's is quite a lot larger, as a ratio we probably sell 9:1 t5's to t4's so the cost of us getting a in van test done on a t4 would probably outway the money we would gain from sales 'because' of it being in van tested. We believe that all beds (if pull tested or not) should be fitted in the strongest way possible, and that's exactly why with every bed we sell is a fitting kit included, the means that it gets fitted into a van the way we have designed it to go in there. And whilst not in van tested I think you'll agree its a nice sturdy fitting kit :)

If you drop an email to [email protected] then ill email you apicure tomorrow morning (otherwise ill only forget!)

Thanks Tom.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm not knocking it at all, don't get me wrong, it way better having the proof that your seat is strong enough..it just seems odd to me from my back ground that no worse case has been done on the fittings?? I.e. The bed was pulled on a surrogate floor, just a simple frame with a skin to replicate the worse single skin van floor and it it stays in with the spreader plates job done... Single skin with a spreader can be surprisingly strong! I witnessed the in vehicle test of a very expensive sports car with a aluminium single skin floor, and the seats were basically bolted to the floor with a big washer on the other side.. My experience and guy said not a chance but it worked well.. I was very surprised... But in that case each seat and runner was only 10kg or so.. (For those who don't know the weight of the seat is times by 20 and added to test loads for each set of anchorages if any the anchorages are contained within the seat. This is because in a crash the seat has to restrain the occupant.. And it's self..the heavier the seat the worse it is for the seat mounts).

However please don't think i am having a go Tom, I have seen the same thing in other segments of the auto trade, the industry has basically set the level or standard required, and although going above that level could be better the commercial benefit does not out weigh the added costs. At least you guys have taken the time and costs to prove your design is strong enough.

Thanks

Karl
 
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