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Discussion Starter #1
If you are fitting a 1.8T using the standard T4 gearbox then you can use the stock gearbox mountings, but need to fabricate the drivers side mount.

There are a few approaches to making the drivers side engine mount, some people have used the complete 1.8T mounting bracket and rubber from the donor car, with a custom mount welded or bolted to the chassis leg for the mount to sit on. Others have used mounts that hang from the standard T4 mount on the chassis, Noo Noo has used a modified T4 mounting bracket and Erinyes has created a custom mount bracket that bolts onto the 1.8T mounting and onto the T4 rubber. Many thanks to Noo Noo, Erinyes and Paul for the photos they’ve provided of their engine mounts.

I originally planned to take Noo Noos approach, but after I offered up a 1.9td and a 2.0 petrol mounting bracket, I couldn’t figure out how it was done, so decided I would have to go custom, which has the benefit of easy tweaking to get the engine position right.

Erinyes:

Noo Noo:

Mine:


I based my mount on Erinyes’, but simplified it slightly as I don’t have access to a metal folder. You will need:
  • 6mm thick steel plate. Free from a metal dealer who owed me a favour.
  • 80mm length of 50mm thick wall box section steel. I got 4mm wall. (a bigger length may be useful in case you need multiple attempts). I got a 50cm length from a local engineering shop for £2
  • Sharp set of drill bits (cobalt preferably), cutting oil. Ideally a pillar drill but a hand drill will do.
  • Files, angle grinder, etc.
  • Access to oxy-acetylene to get the 6mm steel plate bent
  • Access to a welder to get it welded up when you’ve got everything in the correct place.
Fit engine and gearbox into van, bolt up to gearbox mount and lower mount, hang from crane on drivers side.


Put a level across two known points on the chassis and put a level on the fuel rail of the engine, adjust the crane until the two levels match (the van will be slightly higher on the drivers side as currently the crane is supporting the weight of the engine – if you level the engine in relation to the ground it will hang low when the weight is on the chassis).




Cut the main plate out (MP1). Drill 12mm holes to bolt onto the 20vT mounting, optionally drill 7.5mm assembly holes (if you don’t have the ability to tack weld), and bolt it onto the engine – the original bolts are far too long, so use some 28mm spacers or shorter bolts.
Fit the 2.0petrol mounting rubber to the chassis mount. The main plate should be almost touching it at the back of the mount.

Cut out the underside gusset (GU1), the angled section of the gusset should fit neatly between the main plate and the underside of the mounting rubber, if not then your engine must be at a slightly different angle to mine – cut a section of thin wall box steel and cut a wedge from the end, bend the top down until it fits neatly between the mounting plate and the bottom of the mounting rubber.

Unbolt the main plate from the engine, bend it to match either the gusset or the box section. When cool, refit to engine and check that the top of the main plate is parallel with the bottom of the rubber. This should be ~50mm from the rubber, if not, either your installation is very different to mine, this guide is wrong, or you’ve measured wrong. Whatever, good luck and post some comments to help others.

Chop out a 80mm length of 50mm box (or whatever size box you are using – I originally used 40mm box, but it was too small and left the engine at an angle).

Mark the center line in both directions and drill a hole for the rubber mounting to bolt onto, then drill two dents into the box section, 15mm eitherside of the center of the mounting hole, for the locating pins on the mount. Use an appropriately sized nut inside the box section to bolt the rubber mounting onto the box section, then refit it to the chassis.
At this point, the main plate should be nicely pressed up against the box section, if you drilled the assembly holes then reach underneath the plate (assuming the engine is supported appropriately), and mark the centers of the holes on the box section, remove the box section and drill out the assembly holes. Refit and bolt up with a pair of m8 nuts/bolts (this is not strong enough to support the engine under any kind of load, this is just for checking angles – do not get underneath the engine while it is supported in this manner).
Alternatively, apply sufficient tack welds to hold the box onto the main plate.


Gently lower the crane and move it out of the way, compress the suspension in the van a few times (I bounced on the towing eye) and then put a level across the fuel rail to check the engine sits level, if not, adjust as appropriate.

When you are satisfied with the position, support the engine once again, remove the mount and weld it up, applying the gussets for strengthening. The quality of the welding is crucial to your engine not falling out, if in doubt get a professional engineer to do it – they probably wont charge very much at all. I got an agricultural engineer to bend it for me, then a mate to weld it up – don’t trust my welding for something like this!



Once welded, offer up to the engine and check that everything still sits in the right place, if it does, then take it off and paint it.
 

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Just a question, when you levelled up the engine was it absolutely straight across the chassis rails?
I'm using a AUQ engine from a Skoda VRS I'm not using fuel rails because I have a stripped block in at the moment, but with the top of the block level with chassis rails I will only have about 25mm instead of the 50 box you used, so my question is are the o/s engine mounts different on the Skoda to the golf? And should the engine block be level with the chassis..

Thanks in advance
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It turned out that was measured out using an early rubber mount on a late van, so the size of the box section is wrong.
 
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