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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)


This guide is intended to cover most of the pain points when fitting a 1.8 20vT into a VW T4, this is as comprehensive as possible, but I’m sure there are pain points that I’ve forgotten about. Credit to Noo Noo, Erinyes, Paul for all their help when I was doing my conversion, Bud the Spud for talking me through his AUQ conversion on the phone and thanks to Tonic and matt-lmr for inspiration, and all the above for all the photos that I’ve stolen and measured and poured over for months. I’ve stolen some of those photos for this thread, if you want them removed then PM me.

Before you start wrenching, theres a few decision’s you need to make on what you want and how you’re going to fit the 1.8T, these impact which engine and what parts you need to buy:
  • Throttle type: Cable or drive-by-wire.
  • Management: OEM or aftermarket
  • Transmission: T4 or 02J/02M.
  • Tuned or stock, rebuilt or not
  • Which turbo
  • Which Engine
As always, theres pros and cons to everything:
  • A cable throttle gives better throttle response, when you stomp on the pedal the throttle butterfly opens, with drive-by-wire then there is a small delay while the ECU decides to open the throttle, and on poorly mapped ECUs there is a noticeable delay after bringing the clutch up before the throttle opens. A drive-by-wire throttle allows you to fit cruise control for free, which is pretty nice in a camper van for those long motorway runs, and integrates nicely with the standard pedal box, and means you can remap the standard ECU using free software, defeat the immobiliser yourself, mate it up with stock VAG instruments, etc.
  • Standard management gives you VCDS diagnostics, perfect starting in all weather, decent driveability, cheap remaps (including DIY remapping if you want) and the option to retain the standard immobiliser system, but there is a LOT of wiring in a stock loom and its not plug and play into a T4. Aftermarket management means you need a lot less wiring and tweaking the map might be easier (Depending on which ECU you go for), but you might need to splash out on costly interfaces for tuning (looking at you QPEng), you have to use a cable throttle, cold starting and idle is totally dependant on the quality of the map –often not great, and generally aftermarket management seems to need more fettling to get it working happily.
  • T4 gearboxes are 5 speed and generally short ratio, but let you leave the gearbox mounting, linkages and driveshafts all standard but requires you to modify the sump to clear the gearbox trumpet. Using the Golf/A3/TT/Octavia/whatever 02M gearbox means you have the option of much better ratios or 6 speed, but much more fabrication is required including custom driveshafts and they will sit at the wrong angle which may reduce CV joint lifetime.
  • 1.8T engines will tune to 450bhp+ with enough money, but are also very driveable out of the box, or with a mild tune. Its entirely up to you how far to go with tuning, but remember that big power usually comes with reduced longevity, and traction will be an issue unless you have 4wd or a mechanical LSD. There is also an opinion that 1.8T engines require stronger con-rods when fitted to a T4 (in a golf they are generally regarded as necessary for 350bhp+) due to the increased load/revs/drag of the heavier and less aerodynamic van with a shorter gearbox – two of the first 1.8T T4s threw rods, although there may be other factors that caused or contributed. Conversely, there are currently 4 or 5 1.8T T4s that are running standard rods with no ill effects to date.
  • The turbo choice is mostly a factor of how much power you want, although apparently the K03s can be tuned for more torque than a K04 – but when fitting in a T4, there are space implications too – the K04 has nicer boost pipework routing and clears the bulkhead better than the standard K03/K03s. Alternatively the K03 turbo fitted to the Sharan/Alhambra 1.8T is a different design and uses a different manifold to tuck it in lower down on the block, which may clear a T4 bulkhead better, but is probably less good for power.
  • The choice of engine code is mostly influenced by choices above – if you are going for a full house build on custom management the AGU is the sensible choice (cable throttle 150bhp from early golf/A3) as it has bigger valves, higher compression, less emissions junk and various internal differences compared to the later engines, and is generally very cheap too. If you want to put in a standard engine on stock management with a drive-by-wire throttle, then an AUM (150bhp) or AUQ(180bhp) is a good choice as they will tune to 240bhp before you need to change the turbo or any internals. The BAM (225bhp) is the most powerful engine out of the box, and has nicer boost pipework routing and a reversed inlet manifold, but fetch a price premium over the other engines.
My Build
Im fitting the 1.8T to our 1998 2.5 Petrol LWB T4, which is a bit of a budget build, surf/windsurf/mtb and general workhorse van, my priorities are good driveability and reliability. We spent ages working through the stuff above, and had decided on the following:
  • Stock engine – strengthened rods and the associated rebuild takes the cost of the engine from £500 to £1500. I can get bare 20vs for £100, when I blow up the second standard engine, I’ll worry about buying some stronger internals and rebuilding one of my spare engines.
  • Standard management with fly-by-wire – Im a big fan of standard management, I’ve played with Emerald/DTA/KMS/QPEng in the past on various cars, and nothing has really worked as well for daily usage as decent standard management, plus I really want cruise control, diagnostics, and toys like Torque. This pretty much limits me to AUM, AUQ and BAM. AUM and AUQ are the same excluding the map, and BAMs cost actual money.
  • T4 gearbox – when I started my build no-one had fitted an O2M into a T4, and I wasn’t super confident with fabrication so wanted to make as few mounts as possible. Doing it again, I might consider using an 02M so I have a cheap 6 speed.
  • Midly tuned, stock turbo – Im not looking for big power here, just safe overtaking and reasonable performance, so Im going to cap this at around 240bhp with a stage2 tune on a AUQ, with standard K03s. If I do a syncro conversion in the future I might go further with the power, but if Im going to throw money at the van I’d rather fit LPG or go 6 speed. (With hindsight I would consider a K04 just to make the boost pipework nicer and improve the bulkhead clearance, or fit a K03 from a sharan/alhambra and run that maxed at about 200bhp)
So I went out and bought a 80k AUQ engine from a 2001 Seat Leon Cupra, complete with loom, ecu, clocks, key, etc for £500. Slightly over the odds, but it was a known good engine from a mate.

Parts & Costs
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Torques
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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Engine Prep
I’m a firm believer in preventative maintenance, and I’d far rather do jobs when the engine is out and I’ve got good access, even if it pushes up the initial price of the build. Obviously this step is optional, after all that scrapyard engine may well have a good clutch, and back in my student days I have literally yanked an engine from a donor car and thrown it in with no issues. I changed the following:

Cambelt, tensioner damper and water pump, front crank oil seal, cam oil seal, as described here. Make sure you get a water pump with a metal impeller as the genuine water pumps with plastic impellers are known to crack and fail. Seals are genuine, obvs. Don’t even think about the chinese tat from GSF, Id rather stick with the 13yo VW ones and take my chances.


Clutch, flywheel and rear crank oil seal. I’m not a huge fan of DMFs and wasn’t sure if it would actually fit with the stock flywheel, so I used a G60 flywheel with a VR6 clutch (VR6 or TDI flywheel would do equally well). Crank seal is genuine and hugely expensive. Some months after this I was in a bar chatting to a mate who is a motor vehicle engineering lecturer – it turns out the main function of the DMF is to act as a harmonic damper, and without it I may destroy the engine or gearbox, some engines literally misfire if a SMF is fitted. So I advise caution here, maybe fitting a DMF is the right answer! Either way, mine has done 3000miles since I took this photo, the clutch hasn’t slipped and nothing has exploded…yet.



Drain the oil from the new engine, whip the old flywheel off, follow this guide to changing the rear crank seal: http://www.myturbodiesel.com/wiki/rear-main-oil-seal-replacement-mk4-vw-jetta-golf-new-beetle-tdi/ Make sure you use new flywheel bolts when you refit the flywheel, they are stretch bolts and go thin if you re-use them. Also make sure you get the correct length for the flywheel you are fitting, and if you are going SMF then you need different clutch cover bolts to the DMF.




Remove front of van
Access is key. You will probably take the new engine in and out a bunch of times. Drain: gearbox oil, pas fluid, coolant, washer fluid. Disconnect the driveshafts (remember to crack the bolts before you lift the van, or have someone ready to stand on the brakes). Remove: front panel, front bumper, radiator, cross member, headlamps, battery, washer bottle, coolant pipework, etc. Remove Engine and box, then separate the engine and box. While the engine is out, you may wish to consider removing the coolant header tank, as it frees up space for boost pipework and improves access.



Gearbox & Sump Modification
On the AUQ, there is a coolant pipe mounting bolt and some emissions junk that hits the top of the gearbox. I just trimmed the top set of mounting holes off the gearbox with a fine cutting disk (it has two sets of mounting holes, you are using the inner holes). Make sure you do this outside wearing eye protection, aluminium dust is horrible. This may not be an issue if you are fitting an AGU, or you may be able to use an AGU coolant pipe:





You may be able to skip some of this if you are using a 02M gearbox, or using a shortened sump.
Remove the sump and cut off the obvious sticking out junk, again wear protection and do the grinding a long way from your engine and van. While you have the grinder out, remove the 1.8t pas/AC/altenator bracket from the front of the block, and cut the pas pump bracket off the bottom – leaving this on will stop you getting the sump on and off after you’ve got the gearbox extension fitted.



Remove gearbox trumpet from gearbox. Fit gearbox to engine, mark sump where it is hitting trumpet flange. Make sure you take enough sump off to allow you to remove/refit the gearbox trumpet without removing the sump, and remove the sump without removing the trumpet first.





Remove sump, cut out large chunk of sump, refit. Refit gearbox trumpet, mark sump where the output flange on the trumpet hits the sump. Remove sump, cut out large chunk of sump. Refit sump and check that it clears. Remove sump and tig plates in. While you have the tig welder out, weld a plate on the bottom of the sump to act as a boss for the oil drain plug (with the engine at the new angle the old oil drain hole is not at the lowest point. The aluminium of the sump is too thin to directly tap for a sump plug.)



Drill the dipstick hole out on the back of the block, and fit a dipstick. No details, because I forgot this step, everytime I check the oil I have to lift the rad up and reach the dipstick through the gap between rad and bumper. This is REALLY annoying.

Drill and tap the sump for the new oil drain hole, this needs to be done on the bench ideally, as you need the hole to be perpendicular to the plate, or it will never seal properly. Refit the sump with the gearbox trumpet in place and check that everything fits. Don’t bother sealing the sump on just yet, because you need to have the engine at its final angle before you modify the oil pickup.

The stock oil return pipe doesn’t clear the gearbox trumpet, either cut and re-weld the oil return pipe, or blank the old oil return hole and use a banjo on the old drain hole with some silicon hose going to the oil return. I used a banjo from ebay and some silicon hose from http://www.siliconhoses.co.uk/ with a reducer that my housemate turned up on the lathe at work. Talking to pirtek, they didn’t have any rubber pipework that would handle the heat of the oil coming off the turbo, hence I used silicone.

While the engine is out, make a support bracket to go between the gearbox trumpet and the block. Use your original bracket as a pattern for the holes on some angle-iron, trim it to fit the trumpet and bolt it on.



Bolt a plate onto the block, cut a cardboard fillet to get the angle between the angle-iron and the plate, and cut a steel fillet to that template. Weld it together, take it off, seam weld the back, clean and paint.



Engine Mounts
I’ve broken out the engine mount build into a separate post, because it was a very long post. Basically, go make an engine mount: http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=408117

Along the way, you should consider replacing your engine mounting rubbers, theyre probably knackered and swinging the engine and gearbox from them while you mess around making mounts up wont do them any favours. Also, MAKE SURE you torque them up.

Go hang the engine in the van.

Once the Engine is in at the correct angle and sitting happily (and securely – seriously, don’t get under it until its WELL attached), it is time to re-angle the oil pickup. The pickup needs to be at the lowest point in the sump, which means it needs an extension is required (photo credit matt-lmr):



I cut the 20v pickup pipe before it starts to bend, and then cut it so I could spread it slightly open. I pushed some steel pipe that I had kicking around into it, which let me rotate it and adjust the angle without it falling off. Bolted it back up to the engine, slowly fitted the sump, removed the sump and tweaked the angle until it cleared everything but was at the lowest point, then marked it with a punch and took it off to my long-suffering tig-welding mate.



Assuming everything has gone well, you can fit the oil pickup and sump for the last time. Seal the sump on with VAG sump sealent and torque the bolts up correctly. The ones at the flywheel end are a complete tw^t to get to, I used a ball ended allen key as they sit slightly inside the flywheel and you cannot access them with a straight tool. (See Noo Noos comments on removing sumps on one of his threads). Don’t rush this stage, because you REALLY don’t want to have to take the sump off again.

Exhaust
Ideally you want a nice 3” custom downpipe for best performance, and there is plenty of space for it. However, I am not an exhaust fabricator and didn’t fancy trailering the van to my exhaust guy (who quoted me £175 for a custom downpipe), so I built a frankenpipe to go between the Turbo and the T4 mid section:



Chop the flange off the end of the 1.8T downpipe, bolt it up to the turbo, chop the T4 flange off the old T4 downpipe, tack a bit of pipe up to either flange, with a flexi in the middle, take it off and seam weld it, simples!

Im fairly sure that this downpipe is strangling the top end of the van, as it doesnt pull as well as I would expect over 4000rpm, its been enough to get the van MOT'd and put about 3000miles on it, but I plan on getting a custom exhaust built when I've got the time.

Power Steering
As mentioned above, the standard 1.8t pas bracket sits VERY low when its fitted to the T4, so most people relocate the PAS pump to sit where the AC compressor was on the 1.8t (If you wish to retain AC, then look at using an electric PAS pump from a 106/saxo/A-class). I used the PAS pump from a 1.9td T4 with some custom brackets:



I then had the pas pipe extended by 1ft by an agricultural engineer, and used a 1.11m altenator belt. Note the support bracket for the PAS pipe, there is another bracket on the bottom of the engine mount.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Emissions de-clutter
All 20v engines have emissions control kit, the AGU has carbon canister and the later 20v engines also have Secondary Air Injection (SAI). Many people choose to remove this to declutter the engine bay, and reduce the potential for air leaks. Removing the carbon canister purge valve, SAI pump, SAI solenoid, etc will result in fault codes being present in the ECU, so these must either be disabled in the ECU, or the ECU must be tricked into thinking they are still present by replacing them with a resistor of the appropriate value. I chose to disable mine in the ECU.

I don’t have any photos of the SAI delete, but the SAI valve is a large metal valve on the gearbox side of the engine, attached by 3 allen bolts, above/behind the coolant flange. Remove the coolant flange, remove the SAI valve, clean up the end of the block, and apply a blanking plate. Forge do a shiny lazercut plate for too much money, or hack one out yourself with a grinder.

(image credit vw vortex)

Track the vacuum line back from the SAI valve to the control solenoid on the plate at the front of the inlet manifold. Use a 1/4” vacuum elbow to bypass the N122 SAI control solenoid.

There are numerous guides to removing the SAI system, the most definitive on
, however I would discourage following this guide as it also involves removal of the N249 diverter valve control solenoid – this was a fashionable modification for a while, but this valve allows the ECU to open the diverter valve, improving on/off throttle drivability and off-boost economy, the current fashion is to refit the N249. Of course, if you are ditching the factory management you can safely throw this all away.

Crossmember
In a short nose van, the front cross member is VERY close to the inlet manifold. To give clearance for the inlet and boost pipework, trim the front cross member (this is apparently not necessary with a BAM manifold, which has the throttle body on the other side):





Please ignore the really nasty welding, my cross member is rusty as heck and needs replacing, so this was a very quick job.

Boost Pipework
I originally decided to use a LT intercooler, as in Aggies TDI thread http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=15258
However, due to the angle that my radiator sits at, there is not enough space for the LT intercooler between the rad and the front panel of the van. I therefore used a generic intercooler kit from ebay, hung below the bumper.
Screw and thread lock 3 studs into the mounts on the top of the intercooler, if you just bolt it on then you will snap the bolts when you try and remove the intercooler in 2 years time (bolt pictured for assembly/measuring). Cut 3 bits of angle iron, drill them to suit the intercooler studs and drill them as pictured. Position the IC in position against the cross member, drill the cross member and then bolt on the angle brackets.





Fit the cross member to the van, then bolt the IC to the brackets, use nyloc nuts on the intercooler studs.



Boost pipework is dependant on the turbo you are using, and personal preference/skill. The description below is applicable to a K03/K03s turbo. I don’t have fabrication skills/facilities, so went as simple as possible. With the washer bottle bracket removed, there is space for both the turbo intake pipe (TIP) and the stock turbo outlet pipe to run across over to the gearbox side. It is recommended that you fit an uprated turbo intake pipe at the same time. Cut the 90 off the end of the turbo outlet pipe, so that it is a straight coupler and the OEM outlet pipe can sit vertical on it, which will bring it out across the top of the engine pointing at the passenger wing. You should modify a clamp bracket to secure this against the engine and prevent the turbo outlet pipe working loose.



Join the end of this with the pipes supplied with the generic intercooler kit, replace any elbows with decent quality elbows from silicon hoses.com, and secure with decent quality jubilee or hose clamps. Make sure you swage the ends of all boost hoses, or they will blow apart, a lot.

While you are at it, replace the Diverter Valve (dump valve) with a 710N, aftermarket DVs are available but the general consensus in the S4 community is that the stock 710Ns are at least as good, if not better, and are only £30 from VW

To connect the outlet of the intercooler to the throttle body, chop and weld two 90degree sections into a slightly offset U-bend, and secure to the intercooler with soft joiners to allow the engine to rock. If you are using an engine that requires a map sensor (the boost sensor that plugs into the intercooler – AUQ, BAM, AUM, etc), fit a boss for it into the inside of this U-bend. (Thanks to Allard Aluminium Products in Gloucester for swaging and tig welding my boost pipes, at no-notice, for a very reasonable price).



Using a K04 engine with BAM manifold and pipework may be a neater solution, routing the boost pipework around the head and down the gap between the engine and the chassis leg, rather than over the gearbox:
(image credit vanhead)


Plumbing, Radiator
The cooling system of the van is fairly close to stock, on mine I decided to use the standard fans and angle the radiator forward, but there is not enough space for this really, so when I next have it apart I will replace the VW fans with slimline fans. This may allow the radiator to sit in its original position, which would be nice!

While its apart, replace the thermostat, thermostat cover and coolant flange, the latter are plastic and prone to cracking (and are super cheap to replace).

Use the AGU bottom radiator hose to run from the thermostat housing to the bottom outlet on the radiator. Rotate the plastic Y piece around on the top hose and use a straight pipe with a pair of 90s at the end to connect it to the top outlet on the rad (Double check this). You will need to blank the bleed hose (small outlet on the Y piece) and connect the outlet on the top of the radiator directly to the header tank – I relocated the header tank to the drivers side inner wing and used the 20v bleed hose that runs across the top of the inlet manifold, which tees into the water feed for the turbo and just helps keep the cooling system simple. This is the small hose that its disconnected in the picture below). Obviously the return from the oil cooler needs to be connected up to the outlet on the Y piece, via a U-bend.



Leave the T4 heater hoses on the bulkhead, the hose without the bleed fits straight onto the metal waterpipe that goes around the side of the block. The hose with the bleed joins the hose from the donor car, using a 3/4” straight coupling – this cannot go straight on as the takeoff on the plastic flange is larger diameter than the heater hose, the donor hose is a reducer.

Petrol Pipes & Fuel Pump
Use decent quality petrol hose (I sourced mine from pirtek) to connect the T4 fuel lines to the 20v engine. Fix them securely out of the way of moving parts, belts, and make sure they cannot wear against the radiator, fans or anything else.

I am running the stock 2.5 petrol fuel pump, it is there and it works. If you are converting a diesel van, use a fuel pump from a 20v A3/Golf platform car, which will drop straight into the tank and has the benefits of being near silent and having an internal swirl pot. If you are using an external pump, you MUST also fit an external swirl pot, or you will risk fuel starvation.

Bumper
You must make sure the intercooler gets some airflow, or you will get crazy high intake air temps, overboost fault codes and possibly bent conrods. Fit the bumper, mark inside where the end of the IC comes to, then measure and cut a rectangle out to match your grille. I used a mm disc on a grinder (like everything else) to trim the hole, tidied it up with a stanley knife and some sandpaper, then fitted a bumper grille from an e36 m3 (because I had one kicking around) held on with VW black pop-rivets (ebay) and tigerseal. It looks a lot more subtle than this in real life, although doing it again I'd probably spray the IC black first. Its worth adding some ducting to the sides to direct the air through the IC and further reduce the IATs.

 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Wiring
Fly by wire is easy :) the early BAM/AUQ throttle pot (1J2721568F) bolts into the t4 2.5tdi throttle pot bracket and clips onto the 2.5tdi throttle pedal. Wire the 6 wires into the 20v loom in place of the electric pedal and you have working fly by :) Please note that the TDI throttle pot looks similar, but is a different part number and is not compatible.



I started off with the main loom from the handbrake forwards and threw away what I didn't need. There's a lot of stuff that you obviously don't need, like the comfort control module and the headlamp and indicator looms, but really you just need to sit down with the loom and the wiring diagram and a pair of wire cutters - there's so much needed that no one is going to be able to say 'use the red/blue/green wires and bin the rest'. It is essential to get the wiring diagrams for the car you cut the engine out of - for example an AGU from an A3 has a different wiring loom for an AGU from a Golf.

This is what I started off with, spread it all out on the floor and got some help to cut stuff out:



Once I'd cut out the stuff that obviously wasnt needed (HVAC control plug, lighting control plug, lighting wiring, convenience module, wiper wiring, etc), I worked through the 20v fuseboard one fuse at a time, looking up to see what it is and if I need it (I had a pretty clear idea of what I would be using from the van and didnt want to run two fuseboards). If it was something I didnt need, I removed the fuse and cut the wire going to it, then stripped out that wiring from the loom, back until it got to a junction. This left me with something like this:



I hung the wiring loom off the front of the engine, so I could have the diagnostics hooked up to it as I was removing stuff:



Assuming the your loom is similar to the agu and auq looms, there is a small plug on the ecu that goes to all the stuff on the block with a black multiplug that joins the loom on the block to the main loom, and a big plug on the ECU that mostly goes to the clocks/fuseboard, but also goes to the lambda and maf. The small plug stuff you can pretty much leave alone, that just stays on the block. I mounted the ECU on the bulkhead below where the two wiring looms come through, and used the original T4 gromit to push the 20v loom through. This shows the wiring that I'm left with which goes through the bulkhead:



The black multiplug (t16?), top left, plugs onto the loom thats on the block, everything below the grommit goes through the bulkhead and plugs into the fuseboard, or directly into the clocks, the fuseholder goes onto the terminal 30(+) rail in the fuseboard, the yellow, green and brown fuseholders are all switched lives which were fused in the 20v fuseboard, I decided to keep these fused seperately, so got a fuse holder with a bus bar from a sharan/galaxy, which clips onto the side of the t4 fuseboard and is powered by the terminal 15 rail. Fuse holder top left on galaxy board:



Bus bar modified for the blue (live with fuel pump) wiring and the black (live with ignition) fuses:


I wired it up as much stuff as possible went through the correct inputs on the T4 fuseboard, so the water temp gauge wiring goes in on the same pin that it does on the T4 loom, and out through the same pin in the clocks loom. I spliced the T4 clocks loom with the 20v multiplugs so I could run 20v clocks and they plug into the T4 fuseboard. My van was a early 1998 with the green clocks, with blue clocks it would probably be easier.

Fitting later clocks to an early van is straight forward, the later T4 cluster fascia (the clear bit) has the mounting lugs that clip into the dash board, you simply unclip the old cluster and clip in the new cluster. Some mk4 platform clusters will clip straight into the T4 fascia, others require trimming. As a general rule, if there are two pins sticking out the front of the cluster to adjust the clocks/clear the odo, then it will fit the T4 fascia, if there is 1 then it will not. I have tried Leon and Octavia clocks, the Leon ones will not fit without extensive modification, the Octavia VRS clocks clip straight in.

I used a MFA stalk from a mk3 golf, tweaked the wiring slightly, so pressing the MFA button on the end of the stalk is equivalent of pressing up on the mk4 platform MFA stalk, and sliding the switch to 0 is the equivalent of pressing the rest button on the mk4 stalk. That matches up nicely with the T4 cruise control stalk, which I had to add extra wires into the 20v ECU to enable.



Once the clocks are in, clip in the late T4 binacle.

Its worth getting yourself some terminal tools for taking the plugs apart, obviously you will need decent wire strippers, soldering iron, multimeter, power probe, ample heatshrink, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Nice write up . .
How do you find the time. :*
My conversion took me around 4 months ( between work )
What hp you running , , ,
Cheers! I took a LOT of photos while I did the conversion, and made quite a lot of notes, then I started writing them up when I flew to canada a few months back - its taken me about 6 months to find enough time to write this lot up! The conversion probably took me 3 months, fitting in around work and travel, I darent add up the amount of time I spent on it, the wiring alone took over a week.

Im running pretty much stock atm, I dont know how much power its making as the downpipe strangles the top end, once I've got that sorted I'll remap it and then put it on the rollers. I should see about 240bhp with a decent TIP. ATM Its a LOT quicker than it was before, and sounds very cool :)
 

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Great wright up and pictures T: I am mid way through my conversion at the mo must say it's a lot of work especially as I am doing it on my drive no luxury of a garage for me I hit the problem of the oil return from the turbo today I have ordered a banjo as per your link what size was the silicone hose that the you used please as need the order some cheers mole
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Silicone hose is whatever size the banjo took, 10mm iirc. I got my housemate to turn me an adaptor to go between the OE turbo hose and the silicone, but there is probably a simpler way. What spec did you go for?
 

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Busy day on mine today loads more done and some of the wiring but then it went wrong we tried to turn over on the key the starter kicks in but not engaging on the flywheel so not happy any help well appreciated
 

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Help had a busy day on the van today but the starter won't engage on the flywheel anybody got any ideas or is there a different starter I need cheers mole
 

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Hii which starter have you used as I hit a problem with mine yesterday and it won't engage the flywheel cheers mole
 

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In your superb thread you show to cut of the power steering bracket but then how did you mount the pump please
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Sorry I missed these questions, guess you've figured it out, but just in case.

Hii which starter have you used as I hit a problem with mine yesterday and it won't engage the flywheel cheers mole
Im using the original 2.5 petrol starter motor, engages with the G60 flywheel just fine.

In your superb thread you show to cut of the power steering bracket but then how did you mount the pump please
I used a TD/TDI bracket for the PAS pump, bolted that on where the air conditioning compressor sat on the 1.8t, using a bunch of thick washers as spacers, lined it up by eye and used a shorter belt. To secure the PAS hoses, I made up a couple of brackets so they are secured against the engine/engine mount using the brackets on hard lines.
 

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not sure if its something you have considered or not, But what sort of MPG does this little lot achieve? Im looking to bench build a engine and gearbox for mine, 20vT Prefereably 6speed , for the time my tdi conversion gives up
 

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Discussion Starter #16
not sure if its something you have considered or not, But what sort of MPG does this little lot achieve? Im looking to bench build a engine and gearbox for mine, 20vT Prefereably 6speed , for the time my tdi conversion gives up
Im getting 25-26mpg with mixed driving, some A-road, some motorway. The best I've seen is 27 with the cruise on 70 on the motorway. Im running a standard 2.5 petrol gearbox, with a slightly longer 5th, a 6 speed conversion or 88bhp box would probably help a fair bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
not sure if its something you have considered or not, But what sort of MPG does this little lot achieve? Im looking to bench build a engine and gearbox for mine, 20vT Prefereably 6speed , for the time my tdi conversion gives up
With the 2.5 petrol gearbox, which is pulling about 3000rpm at 70MPH, I am getting about 26-28mpg. Over the last 400 miles, mostly on the motorway at 70/50 and some B-roads and lanes, I got 28mpg.
 

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Question.

has anyone tried an oil pick up pipe from either a 1.9 Diesel or 2.0L petrol on the 1.8t oil pump, or at least compared them?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I had a look at lots of pictures before I did my conversion and decided they weren't compatible, but not actually tried one. My goal was to do this with as many factory parts as possible, but I was fairly sure there wasn't any nice solution to the pickup/sump. If you do try it, please post up some pictures.
 
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