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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Replacement Parts for Maintenance


There are a total of four different items needed to change the AFT and filter.

  • Filter (Strainer) - VW # 01M 325 429
  • Filter Gasket - VW # 01M 325 443
  • Pan Gasket - VW # 098 321 370
  • AFT Fluid, 4 litres - VW # G 052 162 A2
Filters & gaskets are also available as a Kit
  • VW #098 398 009A.
The transmission is internally lubricated by a special mineral based semi-synthetic oil made by Petrosin of Germany and is sometimes referred to only by the VW specification "TL 52162", or "G52". It is sold in plastic liters bottles and is available at any VW dealership

Changing the Transmission Fluid and Filter:

The only tricky part is physically getting the new oil into the transmission because the stock vehicle was produced without a dipstick or filler tube. You may wish to consider doing the dip-stick modification and full instructions are on the "Transmission Dip-Stick" page. However, there are several easy ways to adding new fluid without having a dip-stick and long filler tube. You may think up your own method but here is what I think the best:

You will need to purchase about 2 feet (600mm) of 3/4" (19mm) heater hose or clear vinyl tubing from your local hardware or auto parts store.



This tubing or hose will slip over the short plastic fill tube and the top end of the tubing or hose will be connected to a funnel in an easy to reach place just under the hood. This will allow you to simply pour directly from the open liter bottle of ATF into the funnel where it will run down and enter the oil pan through the short plastic fill tube.



These pictures show the heater hose slipped over the fill tube on the transmission case and with a funnel on the top end of the hose in the engine compartment above. (Note - this was not a EuroVan application but the procedure was the same.)

Transmission Fluid Change Procedure

  1. Remove the belly pan and then warm the engine to operating temperature. You may wish to consider driving the front wheels up on ramps for better ground clearance while working on the transmission oil pan. Once the engine is warm, turn it off for the time being.
  2. Position a large drain pan under the transmission. Remove four of the five 10mm hex head bolts holding the transmission oil pan leaving one bolt in one corner loosely installed. Be prepared for the pan to break the seal and drop the hot/warm oil at any moment. You may want to keep a hand against it until you are ready to catch the fluid. Use a rag if the pan is too hot to the touch. Tap or slightly pry on one of the free corners and the whole pan should break free allowing the fluid to drain into the pan. Keep your hands and arms away from the hot fluid. Once most of the fluid has drained, remove the last bolt and remove the pan allowing any fluid in the pan to drop into your drain pan.


  3. Keep the drain pan under the transmission and remove the filter and it's gasket by simple pulling down on the filter. When you remove the filter, additional fluid will drain into the pan. Allow sufficient time for all the fluid from internal parts of the transmission and valve body to eventually drain or drip out.

    TIP - Some people have allowed the transmission to drip overnight thereby removing the maximum amount of fluid possible. This technique probably gets 1/4-1/2 of an additional liter. No matter what there still remains fluid in the torque converter that won't drip out but at least you can get the most out that is possible.
  4. NOTE - If you have already completed a modification of adding a dipstick and tube to the transmission, then you will be refilling the fluid through the top of the dipstick and you can skip this step.

    You will need to remove the red plastic seal over the top of the black plastic fill tube at the front of the transmission. Once you remove the remove the red seal, you then have to remove the cap. In order to do this, you can either leave this tube in place and struggle to remove the red plastic seal at the top along with the cap underneath it. Or you can temporarily remove this entire fill tube which will make it much easier to remove the seal and cap Because you've already removed the pan, it is very easy to remove the entire fill tube assembly. Carefully depress the exposed ends of the prongs of the fill tube from the underside where it fits through the hole and while pushing up at the same time, the entire fill tube will come free. Once you have the entire fill tube assembly out, it is much easier to remove both the red seal and cap without damaging or breaking them. You can now remove the red plastic seal by sliding a small flat screwdriver blade into the slot on its side to release the tab which will allow the seal to open up and be removed from the fill tube. Underneath of the red seal you will find a plastic filler cap that is held on with some small detents that need to be depressed and this cap will come off. They can easily be re-installed when finished so you needn't purchase replacements.


  5. Wipe out the inside of the transmission oil pan making sure that all debris and sludge is removed. There is a flat magnet about 1" X 3" attached to the inside of the pan which should be thoroughly cleaned. Make sure the edges of the pan where the gasket mounts are clean. Because VW uses a rubber gasket and not the cork and sealant mess found on many American cars, the edges should just wipe clean. Do not scrape or grind on the edges.
  6. Install the new gasket onto the pan along with the five steel ferrules into the gasket at each screw hole if they are not already installed. These ferrules provide the exact space required when the bolts are tightened down and don't allow one bolt to become over-tightened and distort the gasket which could lead to a leak.
  7. Using a clean cloth, wipe all debris from the mating surface of the transmission to insure a good seal to the new rubber gasket. Do not scrape the aluminum surface.
  8. Install the new filter and it's gasket (round seal) to the valve body. Its just a simple push fit. It will tend to hang down a little bit because of its own weight but once the pan gets installed, it is impossible for it to fall off.


  9. Use a 5mm hex wrench to remove the Allen plug at the rear of the oil pan. When you do this you will notice that the bolt is actually a plug threaded into a tube which is a press fit or welded to the oil pan. While adding new fluid, this tube is the over-flow so that you can tell when you've reached the full level.
  10. Install the oil pan with the gasket attached. Be sure that you have installed the new filter before attaching the oil pan. I'd like to collect a nickel from everybody that has replaced the pan only to find the new filter still sitting on their workbench. Snug up each of the five 10mm hex head bolts and torque to 80 inch-pounds (8 Newton-meters)


  11. With the engine still off, leave the drain pan under the transmission and pour no more than 2 liters of ATF into the filler tube at the front of the transmission. A small amount will eventually start to drain from the overflow tube opening created when you removed the Allen head bolt at the rear of the transmission pan (you did remove it, didn't you?). Stop pouring when this happens. This means you have only filled the pan to capacity but none of the new ATF is yet distributed throughout the internal working parts so more fluid will still be needed.

    TIP - You may wish to use a clean wide mouth jar at this point to collect the overflow fluid as you may need it to completely refill the system. This overflow fluid may look slightly darker than the new fluid as it has mixed with some of the remaining old fluid but is fine to use if needed. Just how much fluid come out of the overflow depends upon your ability to stop adding new fluid when you see any coming out of the overflow.
  12. With about two liters of fluid already added, start the engine and run the gear selector through all gears. Continue to add fluid slowly. After the engine and transmission are fully warmed up (the transmission oil pan should be hot to the touch, not just warm, as the fluid should be at 130 degree temperature) continue to add additional fluid through the filler until it begins to run out the overflow tube. Run the selector through all gears again and top off again. You may have to repeat this several times to obtain a maximum fill amount. Most people report that as a minimum you should be putting back 3-1/2 liters of fluid and some have reported using almost a full 4 liters.

    TIP - A second person changing the gear shift while you are refilling with new fluid will speed the process (and make it easier on your hands and knees).

    CAUTION - While the engine is running, keeps your fingers and clothes away from the serpentine belt. In addition, the pan and fluid will get very hot as will many of the coolant hoses nearby. It is best to wear a long sleeve shirt to avoid any burns. Avoid the radiator fans which will come on automatically as the engine coolant temperature increases.
  13. Once you are certain that you can not add any more fluid without it spilling out the overflow tube, replace the Allen head plug at the back of the transmission oil pan and use a 5mm hex wrench to tighten securely. You can now shut the engine off.
  14. If you have used a hose or tubing to add the new fluid, simply pull or carefully pry the end off of the black plastic fill tube. Push the cap back down in place and re-attach the red seal (if you were careful about removing them then this means you can reuse them now. Otherwise, if you removed them while the fill tube was still attached to the transmission, you may have damaged them because of the restricted work area).

    CAUTION - The transmission case will be hot while you attempt to replace the fill tube cap and seal. You may wish to consider allowing it to cool somewhat before proceeding.
  15. Use a clean cloth and wipe any traces of ATF from the external surfaces of the pan, overflow plug, and all around the rubber gasket where it meets the transmission case. Start the engine and allow it to run for several minutes and then recheck for any leaks.
  16. Replace the belly pan. Properly dispose of the used fluids.
 

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Re: Automatic Gearbox: Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF) Change - photoguide

A really good guide above - helped me out as I did my oil change myself.

The only thing I will mention is that when I went to a VW dealer to get the bits and oil VW said I would need 7 litres of oil. After checking the dip stick after each empty bottle and stopped at 4 :) .
 

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Re: Automatic Gearbox: Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF) Change - photoguide

Instructions don't come much better than this, thanks Jim. I'm trying to find the Transmission Dip-Stick modification info. Any idea how I find it using Search as it doesn't seem to want to be found!
Thanks,
Claire
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Re: Automatic Gearbox: Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF) Change - photoguide

The gearbox model Phase I, 098 (01P), 1990 - 1994 Without a lock-up torque converter came with a dipstick:



Parts:

51 098321405C oil filler pipe 40.5 Euro
54 098321431E oil dipstick 13.65 Euro
52 003321419B round seal 0.95 Euro

Prices from VAG cat

You will also need some hexagonal head bolts (M6X15)

These can be easily retrofitted.
 

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Great guide Jim - Thanks!
I have a quick question.
My 2003 T4 Caravelle has the auto box (I had to replace it 3 years ago!!) and I was wondering if the VW G56 spec oil can be used instead of the G52 stuff? My local motor factors has it much cheaper that VW.
Thanks
Pat
 

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I have a Phase I gearbox and found that the strainer and strainer gasket were different.

Heres the part numbers written on the parts. I didn't manage to order them as I only found this out while doing the job! doh!
Filter (Strainer) - VW # 095325429D
Filter Gasket - VW # 095325443A
The Pan Gasket is the same.
Pan Gasket - VW # 098 321 370

I'd also recommend changing the dipstick o-ring at the same time
O-Ring VW # 003321419B

I also found that I didn't have an overflow (or I couldn't for the life of me find it anywhere!). I just ended up adding the fluid slowly until it was at the desired level.

Cheers for the super helpful article Jim.

S
 

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Found my overflow was at the front,,not back as stated, but couldn't budge it and ended up rounding the allen key hole so did the same as 'steviehype' and filled till at the right level...(1994 German made gearbox)
 

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Anyone out there with a Trans Cooler ever try changing ALL the fluid in the trans, even the stuff in the TC by using the Trans Cooler lines? Seems that a full fluid replace should work if doing it that way...
 

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Re: Automatic Gearbox: Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF) Change - photoguide

hi jim just wondering if i need to jack up the front wheels to let it get into second and third, I have a bonus 1.5 litres. So either I am doing it wrong or the guy before me waaaay overfilled.
 

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Awesome write up. Very detailed. Still not confident enough to tackle this myself nor do I have the time is there a garage in London someone can recommend who can do this also how much would it roughly cost? Thanks again
 

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Hi Jim hope all is well I done my filter did not see this thread but done it all as u have described my van was running OK but now it won't come out of drive even in Park the band still goes forward and in neutral and it won't engage reverse I'm getting closer and closer to my house on the drive I'm running out of space any ideas would be great can't wait to go backwards in my van cheers mate t4 Scottie
 

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"An error occurred. Please try again later. (Playback ID: 2ZR7fRDnJrXqt6BM) "

There's a VERY good write-up on the forum......

You MUST have VCDS to check the temperature.

You can also only change around 70% of the fluid each time, as the torque converter doesn't drain.
4 or 5 changes, at something like 70 quid/litre, should get you with "new" fluid.

If you can find a "professional" garage that has the equipment to pressure change, that does the converter as well.


People who post video on YouTube.....well, I just think they are trying to swell their heads even bigger!!
Often......they do it wrong also.:eek:


Yorkshiremen are well know for keeping their heads down and NOT being seen...I:
Hence the Flat Cap.T:
 

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Not sure if this is an ancient thread or not, but I intend changing the tiny auto oil cooler and have everything I need, but no idea how to go about the oil top-up needed.
All the mechanical work is simple, but when I undo the original cooler, will I get oil pouring out of the in/out - or nothing (does the system pressurise and force oil through the radiator?).
I have 2 litres of Febi and don't really want to drain the box yet, just change the coolers.
Any help would be appreciated thanks.
 
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