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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
OK despite having done quite a few timing belts over the years, I was pretty nervous about taking on the work myself, so now the job is done I thought I’d share the knowledge. It's a big job, and although what I've got below is a bit long winded, there's probably loads more that could probably be added.

As you'll probably read, I messed up the installation of the oil seal (somehow), so no doubt will be doing the job again in the coming weeks, so will make an effort to get some photos..........HOWEVER, there are far to many to be messing around with photobucket, so any other ideas on this?

Mods, is there any way of loading a PDF onto the forum?

I think it would be good if everyone who's done the job inputted to this, expecially if there are several ways of doing something. If you think I've missed anything, or just got it plain wrong, then please let me know and I'll try and correct it. Photo's of other peoples timing marks would be good to, as there are at least two different types it seems.

In addition to photo's, I'll go through Elsawin at some point and get the torque settings in there, and also more detailed VAG COM instructions.

I’d also like to say a big thanks to all of you who replied to my previous post with useful info before I started.

The description is based on a 2002, 2.5 ACV Engine on an Ex AA vehicle.

OK, I’ll start with a list of tools required:

1) Standard Socket Set

2) 27mm socket (an impact one if you have a windy gun)

3) Springclip pliers (for water hoses) and normal pliers

4) Hex (allen) keys

5) Torx keys

6) Set of ring spanners (sizes 10 and 13 come up constantly throughout the job)

7) Inspection Lamp (for spying the timing mark on the flywheel)

8) Camshaft locking tool (about £10 from GSF)

9) Vibration Damper Counterhold - I was caught out by not having this tool. I couldn’t find any aftermarket tool as a replacement, and manufacturing the tool is beyond the scope of DIY. Some people on this forum have used milling machines etc to manufacture their own. The VW part no. for this tool is T10025 and it is £29+vat. VW DO NOT sell tools to the public. I had to beg, plead and offer sexual favours to get this tool.



10) Two legged puller (if you intend to do the crankshaft oil seal or remove crankshaft sprocket for any other reason)

11) Air Impact Wrench – I didn’t use one of these, but removing the vibration damper bolt required extreme force, and had anything slipped I would have ended up with a broken hand.

12) VAG COM – Available from RossTech. I have this, but I believe that you could undertake the belt change yourself, and simply have the injection timing set by your local garage. My van started and drove fine after the belt change, but when I plugged it into VAG COM it said it was too far out to plot.

13) Forked Tool – for counterholding sprockets. I made this years ago from two pieced of steel angle and has been useful for many jobs since.

14) Torque Wrench (up to 160Nm)


OK, and as for the work here goes:

1. Start by ensuring you have the correct tool, or suitable alternative to remove the damper pulley. This is the large black pulley on the end of the crankshaft, and is easily accessible without dismantling anything, so you can check this easily before starting.

2. Remove intercooler and hoses. 10mm socket and springclip pliers req’d.

3. Remove front grill from radiator. 3 phillps screw on top, two slightly thicker Phillips screws in the front. Lift the grill away. Mine was a bit stiff at first, and required carefully prising on the edges below the headlights. I greased the locator lugs before replacing at the end of the job.

4. Undo 13mm bolts securing black plate above radiator (the one with the stickers on).

5. Lift the radiator and gently pull it forward.

6. I also removed the fan from the back of the radiator (torx screws), but looking back I don’t believe that this was necessary.

7. There is no need to remove any pipes from the radiator, unless you intend to replace the water pump (recommended), in which case disconnect the lower hose (or remove drain plug if it has one – mine didn’t). Make sure the heater in the cab is in the hot position before draining the coolant.

8. Remove four bolts from cylinder head cover (rocker cover), and lift the cover away. This is a bit of a faff as the injector pipes and cabling get in the way. Note that the drivers side end of the cover tucks under the plastic cam belt guard, so lift the other end first.

9. Undo two 13mm bolts securing injection pump belt timing guard to expose the belt.

10. Working under the engine, place a large screwdriver between the drivebelt tensioner (top left) and its pivot bar. Lever the tensioner toward the front of the engine and remove belt. A special tool is available for this tensioner which attempted to buy. I couldn’t work out how it fitted and ended up using the screwdriver. With hindsight I believe I was sold the wrong tool (it looks different to the picture in the manual), but either way, a screwdriver works fine.

11. The timing belt upper plastic cover is held on by two small spring clips. Carefully release these with a small screwdriver (from above) and remove the cover (from below).

12. Before proceeding, set the engine to Top Dead Centre (No 1 piston at top of travel) and ensure you know how the timing is set. It’s also worth making tipex marks to avoid mistakes. The engine should be turned by the bolt on the damper pulley (27mm socket). A word of warning though, my Ex AA was set previously using paint marks which were not at TDC, which confused the hell out of me. You should be able to get it pretty close to TDC visually by observing the cam lobes above the no. 1 piston (drives end). These should be pointing outward parallel to the cylinder head. The corresponding position of the crankshaft damper pulley is with the ‘lug’ toward the back of the engine. The injection pulley has two small marks on the front (tricky to see). Now you have it roughly at TDC, place an inspection lamp over the clutch housing and observe the flywheel through the inspection hatch (this is roughly below the upper bolt of the injection pump timing guard that you previously removed). A small downward pointing arrow can be seen on the casing, which the timing mark on the flywheel should be aligned with. The mark on the flywheel is tiny, and very difficult to see. You should spend time with an assistant turning the crankshaft slowly until you are certain you have found this mark. When you have found it, check that the camshaft is at TDC and the damper pulley is in the position described above. Now make your tipex marks. Remember that the crankshaft turns twice for every revolution of the engine, whearas the camshaft and injection pump only turn once.

13. Now release the belt tensioners on the injection belt (passenger side) and remove belt.

14. The sprocket on this end of the camshaft can now be removed. Counterhold the sprocket with the forked tool and undo the bolt.

15. After removal of the sprocket, the end of the camshaft should be visible, with a slot that runs parallel with the cylinder head (assuming the engine is still at TDC). You can now verify your TDC by inserting the camshaft locking tool into this slot. The protruding forks from the tool should sit across the top of the cylinder head.

16. Now its time to remove the damper pulley. Insert the counterhold tool, and loosen the bolt. I found that I had to turn the engine away from TDC before the tool would fit (too long to fit under the van at a steeper angle), and therefore had to turn the engine back to TDC afterwards by placing the forked tool in the camshaft sprocket (drivers side).

17. I believe an air impact wrench (windy gun) would be the safest way to loosen this bolt, however I didn’t have access to one, so used a power bar and extreme brute force. I wouldn’t recommend this on safety grounds, but they’re your fingers at the end of the day.

18. Once the bolt is loose, remove the four studs from the pulley, then carefully remove the centre bolt and pulley.

19. Now slacken the tensioner pulley bolt. Once the bolt is slackened, the tensioner should release from the belt, allowing the belt to be removed.

20. If you intend to renew the water pump, remove the back plates. This is done by removing a number of bolts (10 and 13mm). Two of the bolts securing the upper back plate are also securing the water pump. Once ALL the bolts are removed, a bit of patience is required to ‘wiggle’ the plates free.

21. Now remove the remaining water pump bolt and remove pump (be prepared to get covered in coolant and there’s always a load still lurking in the engine).

22. If you intend to replace the crankshaft oil seal, the timing sprocket must be pulled off. Do not under any circumstances try to lever this pulley off. Not even if you do it gently as I did, otherwise it will cost you £15 and another trip to VW. I screwed two of the studs part way into the sprocket, placed a short extension bar into the bolt hole in the crankshaft, then used a two leg puller to pull the bolts, pushing against the extension bar. Only a small amount of force was required in the end, but it needed to be pulled in exactly the right direction.

23. Place a self tapping screw in the oil seal, then pull the oil seal out by pulling the screw with pliers.

24. Smear some grease on the new seal. A special tool is used to seat the new oil seal. You obviously won’t have this, so use a large tube or large socket (35mm I think) to drift it home. I now have an oil leak from this seal, so be careful to drift it in straight, without damaging it. I’m not yet sure what I did wrong but will be doing the job again in a few weeks to rectify the problem!!!!! – Be warned.

25. Replace back plates.

26. Replace crankshaft sprocket, tapping it home gently.

27. Remove and replace all three tensioners and bolts (two for injection timing belt and one for drivers side belt).

28. Install new waterpump. It’s probably worth refilling the cooling system at this point (remember to replace drain plug or radiator hose), that way, if the new pump has been installed incorrectly, you’ll realise before reassembling the whole job.

29. Double check that the crankshaft and camshaft are still at TDC, then reinstall timing belt on drivers side. Turn the tensioner until arrows align then tighten bolt.

30. Reinstall lower belt cover.

31. Reinstall damper pulley and bolt. This bolt is a ‘Tension to Yield’ bolt or ‘Stretch’ bolt, so must be renewed. Initially tighten the bolt using a ratchet just tight enough so that it can be used to turn the engine.

32. Reinstall studs through damper pulley to timing sprocket.

33. Now turn the engine though several revolutions to ensure the belt is seated properly and no valve to piston contact occurs.

34. Now return the engine to TDC and ensure that the flywheel mark aligns when the camshaft locking tool is inserted.

35. Now proceed to tighten the damper bolt. Tighten to specified torque then turn another 180 degrees. As were now turning the bolt the other way, I was able to turn the bar using my feet!

36. Now install injection pump belt, setting the pump as accurately as possible to your previous tipex marks. Tighten sprocket bolt using the ‘forked’ tool to counterhold.

37. Now reinstall all removed parts.

38. Turn the engine by hand again just to be absolutely certain.

39. Switch engine on.

40. It may not start very well, that’s fine. Take it for a drive and get it up to temperature.

41. Start VAG COM computer.

42. Leave the engine idling whilst removing radiator grill and lifting radiator forward again (careful its hot). This is to keep the engine as warm as possible for the tuning process.

43. Now use VAG COM to check injection timing. I had two problems at this stage. First was keeping the engine hot enought, and second fault codes were generated by the poor timing, which seemed to cause problems reading the timing somehow. Best bet is to clear fault codes before reading the timing. The magic number your looking for is 55.

44. Slacken the camshaft sprocket bolt, counterholding with forked tool.

45. If the timing is advanced, turn sprocket by hand anticlockwise, if its retarted, turn it clockwise. We’re talking millimetres here.

46. Tighten bolt, counterholding the pulley again, and ensuring it doesn’t move.

47. Switch engine on and use VAG COM to check timing again.

48. This process may need to be repeated several times (or more!) before you get the timing just purrrfect.

49. Now reinstall injection belt cover, slide radiator back and install grill.

50. You’re done…………………unless you discover a leak from the crankshaft oil seal like I did………..:(:(:(
 

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Re: HOW TO: Diy Cambelt Change - All input welcome

Bravo Cavemud, bravo! A:A:
Mate that was an undertaking and a half, I for one really appreciate the efforts you've gone to to explain the process so carefully. Top job! T:
Might just have saved me a couple hundred quid when it needs doing. Beer in order if I ever meet youy at any of the do's :ILU:
 

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Re: HOW TO: Diy Cambelt Change - All input welcome

Boy could I have done with this around Christmas! LOL:
Well done for such a detailed guide! :ILU:

One question though, what's the Vibration Damper Counterhold for? I've literally just put mine back on (for the 3rd time!) and used a screwdriver on the flywheel teeth to keep the crank still. Was this correct or do I need that counterhold tool for something vital that I've missed?
 

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Re: HOW TO: Diy Cambelt Change - All input welcome

A: Top job m8 sorry to hear bout the oil seal

ill be attemptiong mine this week /end at some point

unless you fancy doing another LOL:

Quote me happy !!!
 

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Re: HOW TO: Diy Cambelt Change - All input welcome

That is an awesome guide! T:

Top job! Even though I'll never in a million years attempt to do this myself... some things are best to left to those in the know.;)
 

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Re: HOW TO: Diy Cambelt Change - All input welcome

Superb thread. Just makes me even more pleased that I have a good mechanic who did mine yesterday - bargain of the year 1.9 inc belt and labour £130! A:
dude who is that?


I just paid £170 for same job.

Then again it would have been less if i hadn't given him the wrong key (wihtout imob chip)
so he spent hours dismantling the fuel system trying to work out why it wasn't getting fuel.


Gonna need some more stuff doing soon me thinks.


Nice guide btw cavemud
 

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Re: HOW TO: Diy Cambelt Change - All input welcome

Good stuff cave mud.

One thing to note is that the flywheel markings are sometimes real hard to find.
 

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Re: HOW TO: Diy Cambelt Change - All input welcome

dude who is that?


I just paid £170 for same job.

Then again it would have been less if i hadn't given him the wrong key (wihtout imob chip)
so he spent hours dismantling the fuel system trying to work out why it wasn't getting fuel.


Gonna need some more stuff doing soon me thinks.


Nice guide btw cavemud
Mick Flashman at NRG in Georgeham. He does a lot of T4s and is a top man. Does loads of 50s and 60s American motors too, so is very creative and thinks outside the box!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Re: HOW TO: Diy Cambelt Change - All input welcome

Thanks guys.......

Mr Self Destruct.............. Yep, the counterhold tool is the 'proper' tool to stop the engine turning whilst undoing the crankshaft bolt. Mine was insanely tight. I started by using an old (ie good) steel screwdriver, but it bent like a banana.......

I also tried several other methods, but was worried about ending up with half a screwdriver in the bell housing, or worse a damaged flywheel.....

Things might have been a bit different had I had a windy gun.......

For people thinking of doing this job though, you can loosen this nut before doing anything else, that way you don't end up with no van while you mess around trying to manufacture tools etc.
 

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Re: HOW TO: Diy Cambelt Change - All input welcome

Top job cavemud.
I had a good read of your post and last weekend myself and my dad changed the timing belt, idler pulleys,injector belt,waterpump and replaced the leaking crank oil seal.We made up a tool to hold the damper pulley.It was insanly tight so had to use an extension lever to loosen.The tool however buckled in the process.So with everything back on we made a beefed up verision with double the wall thickness.The bolt was retighted to 118 foot pound and 180 degree turn and it took the load no problem.
Didnt have VAG COM to time the injector pump but she started first turn.Im looking into finding a way to manually time the injector pump using a plunger dial guage which is the old skool method.
Thanks for the tips:)
 

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Re: HOW TO: Diy Cambelt Change - All input welcome

I second that sticky or saving the thread - very good stuff.

For pics you could try linking to the album itself :) Hope this helps
 

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Re: HOW TO: Diy Cambelt Change - All input welcome

Hi,

I have been trying to follow your instructions, Cavemud but am failing to find the marks on the injection pump pulley which has a substantial damping weight attached. And in any case, what do I align it to. My injector pump belt snapped so I'm trying to time it again. I have find one single mark on the back side of the damper of the pulley but still nothing to align to.

Also there is an inspection port in the bellhousing when viewed from below and when the lug on the antivibration pulley is facing towards the back of the engine as you suggested, I can see what looks like a timing mark through this hole. All very congested from above. So assuming that the timing of the crank is in order, how do I match the timing of the injector pump before putting on the new belt.

Thanks for all help.

J
 

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Re: HOW TO: Diy Cambelt Change - All input welcome

one of the mechs at work called this job up on their computer in the workshop that pretty much tells you what to do. what parts to get and what to avoid - he printed it out for me - i could pdf it by scanning it - don't know how to get it on here though.....

burko
 

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Re: HOW TO: Diy Cambelt Change - All input welcome

Thanks for the guide Mr Cavemud. You are a legend. I will be attempting this soon and am sure I will make good use of this info.
 

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Thanks Cavemud for your writeup. I took a photo of how I tightened the crank bolt that worked really well. The undoing is done with the tool against the front suspension & held steady with the jack.


The neat fitting pipe over the 3/4 L handle is moved in & out to make it easier to tighten.
There wasn't a lot of room to swing so the socket is moved on the nut to give the next movement.
 

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This is the tool I used to remove the lower cam pulley to get access to the crank seal that I needed to change. It was damaged where the belt runs, I presume where the last garage didn't have a puller & started hitting with a hammer to remove it.
This tool I had & was made for some model of Ford to remove the harmonic balancer.
It turned out that 2 of the holes lined up perfectly.
If anyone wants to make one ahead of time , the centre distance for the holes is 46mm & the hole dia. is clearance on 8mm. A disc is inserted down the bore of the pulley against the end of the crank for the screw to jack against.

 

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This is the special torch I use to find the flywheel timing mark. I found by poking the light into the housing hole & by bending the flexible shaft I was able to see the mark a lot easier.

 
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