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Hi all, I tried posting this in the tech section but I'm not allowed so someone will have to do it for me.

I recently had to do this job and found that although the info on the other How To was useful, it took me 11 pages and some of the information was incorrect for my model type, so here's a comprehensive guide with pictures, and all part numbers and info needed for carrying out the job on a 2.4.

Cheers


How to fix a worn or leaking diesel pump throttle spindle on 2.4D VW Transporter T4.

I found myself needing to carry out this repair after adjusting the throttle linkage caused the O ring to fail, upon further inspection it wasn't the only worn part in the assembly. My van has covered over 220,000 miles so it's lasted as well as could be expected. People claim to do this job in 30 minutes, but allow yourself a couple of hours if you're pretty confident with mechanicals. If you take your time and use the right tools it's an easy and enjoyable job.

Tools and equipment required

17mm Socket
13mm Socket
10mm Socket
8mm Socket

A sharp knife or screwdriver

Allen Keys

Cross headed and straight screwdrivers

A small hammer

A freezer

Boiling water

A small amount of diesel


Firstly, I removed the slam panel, and moved the rad assembly out of the way. As we all know it slides forwards a little, but if you remove and clamp off the power steering pipes you can push it to the side entirely, tie or prop it up and access is much better. I also removed the belly pan to make it easier if I dropped anything.



Firstly, remove the clip that secures the end of the accelerator cable to the throttle linkage, and disconnect the cable, putting the clip in a safe place.

Next, remove the 10mm nut from the end of the throttle spindle, being careful not to move the throttle spindle at all at this point. Underneath this nut is a washer which needs to be removed. On some T4's there is a groove for a screwdriver to make removing this washer a little easier, but on mine there wasn't so it needs to be carefully levered out using a knife or sharp screwdriver. Underneath this washer, you will find 10 lines, 5 either side of the spindle hole. It is crucial that you mark which lines the groove in the top of the throttle spindle align with, before removing the cover. Taking a photo also works. This ensures that the spindle goes back in the same place for reassembly, thus retaining the correct setting and avoiding a lot of guesswork.





Next, you need to remove the throttle lever. There is no need to disturb the end stop bolts, so leave these where they are. Take a note of the positioning of the spring and the black plastic spring seating, then remove the lever. The spring is under tension so be careful. Remove the spring and the plastics, and you will be left with the throttle spindle sticking out of the bronze bush.




Next, using a 17mm socket remove the banjo bolt from the return pipe on the top of the lid, (Blue pipe), watching out for the two copper washers.



Next, remove the 4 Allen bolts that secure the lid of the pump casing to the body. There is no spring inside the lid unlike other pumps, so don't worry about that, just push the spindle down the bush housing towards the pump and lift off the lid, ensuring the spindle is fully removed from the bush and you're not pulling it. There is no need to remove the max fuel screw at this point, however it does hold a lever under tension inside the pump so you will hear a metallic type noise when lifting the lid, don't worry.


The spindle and assembly now needs to be removed from the pump. This procedure is quite straight forward, you need to push the assembly to the left, until the flat section is aligned with the slot, and lift it towards you. You will now be able to observe the wear to the components. My original bronze bush was worn almost oval, the spindle O ring badly perished, and the spindle worn badly on one side, about 20 thou.




The next step is to remove the bronze bush from the lid. The easiest and least destructive way to do this is with heat. Place the entire lid in a heatproof bowl and immerse in boiling water for a few minutes. Heat makes the aluminium housing expand which makes removing the bronze bush a hell of a lot easier. Find a socket that fits on top of the bush, but not bigger than the hole in the casing. As soon as you remove the lid from the water, push the bush out downwards using a sharp knock with the hammer on a solid flat surface. If you fail to knock it out, reheat the casing and try again. Put the new steel bush in the freezer for an hour or so, this makes it contract. Ensuring the bush housing in the lid is entirely clean, drop the bush in, straight after removing it from the freezer, knocking it home with a hammer if necessary.




Fit the new lid gasket.


Next, you need to remove the max fuel screw. People seem to be scared of this, but so long as you mark it's position in reference to the lid prior to removal there's no need to panic. Often the yellow paint is enough of a mark.


Next you need to build up the new spindle assembly. Remove the spring assembly from the old spindle and refit to the new. This procedure is pretty self explanatory, just make sure you align all the grooves and it clicks into place. Next, fit the new shim, followed by the O ring. Lubricate the O ring with a little diesel if you struggle. I ordered two just in case I broke one. Refit the entire built up spindle assembly back to the pump.

Note wear markings on the old spindle




Now, refit the lid making sure the mating faces are clean. Lubricate the inside of the bush with diesel and the new spindle should push up relatively easily. Be careful at this point not to twist or bent the spindle assembly, it will be obvious when the spindle is at the top of the bush.


Refit the max fuel screw, aligning the previous marks.

Next, you need to fill the pump with diesel, up to the brim of the return pipe exit hole. You want as little air in the pump as possible. Refit the banjo with the bolt and 2 copper washers.



Refit the spring and plastic seating. You will need to tension the spring with a screwdriver, so that the hooked end is in the right place to engage with the lug on the throttle linkage when it's located on the spindle with the lines aligned with the notch on the spindle top. Refit the spindle securing washer and nut. Re attach the throttle cable, and Bob's your real dad.

Refit the radiator and power steering pipes if removed, topping up power steering fluid if much has leaked, and start it up.

To order the correct parts for your particular pump, you will need to quote the Bosh part number on the underside of your pump. This is mine, the part number is 0 460 485 035


My van is a 1998 2.4D. These are the correct Bosch part numbers, descriptions and prices of parts needed for this pump.

1463162104 Throttle Spindle £21.18
1461015302 Lid Gasket £1.46
1460324333 Spindle Bush £8.75
1460210008 O Ring £1.30
1200101640 Shim £0.62

I bought my parts from TT Automotive in Loughborough. Great service and they do mail order. I had to have the parts sent to me in France and they were with me the same week.

www.ttauto.co.uk



Pete
 

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Great write up there mate. I never got round to writing it up myself when I did the spindle seal.

Did you use a rubber band or piece of string to hold the linkage out the way when you put the top cover back on?

T:
 

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Under the top cover, can't remember what it looks like now. I know if you don't use string etc it's gets in the way. I read this from a Pug pump rebuild thread. They used variations of this pump on lots of different makes of vehicles. Izuzu, Pug, Vauxhaul, Mitsubishi. Toyota use one which is based on the Bosch pump but only difference is the top cover and seal. I used a Toyota seal kit to fix my leaky spindle.

I will see if I can find my old links to this info. Not much use to you now you have done yours but it might help some other members on here T:
 

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In the bottom left hand corner next to spring assembly. Think it's this part that fouls the top cover and if you use a small piece of string with a loop around it, makes it a lot easier to get the top cover back on. just before you fix it in place you can snip it with scissors and pull it out the way.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ah! yes that was the prime reason for removing the max fuel screw prior to refitting, as it was only catching on the screw body as far as I recall. If I had of used the string method I wouldn't have needed to remove the screw.
 

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Does your pump not have the brass spring you can see in my photos or had you already removed it, I think you commented on it in one of your posts?
 

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Thanks for this write up! It's great!

Where did you get the rubber seal, metal spindle and brass bush from please?

I'm hoping to do this and I'm struggling to track the parts down.

Thanks in advance, J
 

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Hi all, I tried posting this in the tech section but I'm not allowed so someone will have to do it for me.

I recently had to do this job and found that although the info on the other How To was useful, it took me 11 pages and some of the information was incorrect for my model type, so here's a comprehensive guide with pictures, and all part numbers and info needed for carrying out the job on a 2.4.

Cheers


How to fix a worn or leaking diesel pump throttle spindle on 2.4D VW Transporter T4.

I found myself needing to carry out this repair after adjusting the throttle linkage caused the O ring to fail, upon further inspection it wasn't the only worn part in the assembly. My van has covered over 220,000 miles so it's lasted as well as could be expected. People claim to do this job in 30 minutes, but allow yourself a couple of hours if you're pretty confident with mechanicals. If you take your time and use the right tools it's an easy and enjoyable job.

Tools and equipment required

17mm Socket
13mm Socket
10mm Socket
8mm Socket

A sharp knife or screwdriver

Allen Keys

Cross headed and straight screwdrivers

A small hammer

A freezer

Boiling water

A small amount of diesel


Firstly, I removed the slam panel, and moved the rad assembly out of the way. As we all know it slides forwards a little, but if you remove and clamp off the power steering pipes you can push it to the side entirely, tie or prop it up and access is much better. I also removed the belly pan to make it easier if I dropped anything.



Firstly, remove the clip that secures the end of the accelerator cable to the throttle linkage, and disconnect the cable, putting the clip in a safe place.

Next, remove the 10mm nut from the end of the throttle spindle, being careful not to move the throttle spindle at all at this point. Underneath this nut is a washer which needs to be removed. On some T4's there is a groove for a screwdriver to make removing this washer a little easier, but on mine there wasn't so it needs to be carefully levered out using a knife or sharp screwdriver. Underneath this washer, you will find 10 lines, 5 either side of the spindle hole. It is crucial that you mark which lines the groove in the top of the throttle spindle align with, before removing the cover. Taking a photo also works. This ensures that the spindle goes back in the same place for reassembly, thus retaining the correct setting and avoiding a lot of guesswork.





Next, you need to remove the throttle lever. There is no need to disturb the end stop bolts, so leave these where they are. Take a note of the positioning of the spring and the black plastic spring seating, then remove the lever. The spring is under tension so be careful. Remove the spring and the plastics, and you will be left with the throttle spindle sticking out of the bronze bush.




Next, using a 17mm socket remove the banjo bolt from the return pipe on the top of the lid, (Blue pipe), watching out for the two copper washers.



Next, remove the 4 Allen bolts that secure the lid of the pump casing to the body. There is no spring inside the lid unlike other pumps, so don't worry about that, just push the spindle down the bush housing towards the pump and lift off the lid, ensuring the spindle is fully removed from the bush and you're not pulling it. There is no need to remove the max fuel screw at this point, however it does hold a lever under tension inside the pump so you will hear a metallic type noise when lifting the lid, don't worry.


The spindle and assembly now needs to be removed from the pump. This procedure is quite straight forward, you need to push the assembly to the left, until the flat section is aligned with the slot, and lift it towards you. You will now be able to observe the wear to the components. My original bronze bush was worn almost oval, the spindle O ring badly perished, and the spindle worn badly on one side, about 20 thou.




The next step is to remove the bronze bush from the lid. The easiest and least destructive way to do this is with heat. Place the entire lid in a heatproof bowl and immerse in boiling water for a few minutes. Heat makes the aluminium housing expand which makes removing the bronze bush a hell of a lot easier. Find a socket that fits on top of the bush, but not bigger than the hole in the casing. As soon as you remove the lid from the water, push the bush out downwards using a sharp knock with the hammer on a solid flat surface. If you fail to knock it out, reheat the casing and try again. Put the new steel bush in the freezer for an hour or so, this makes it contract. Ensuring the bush housing in the lid is entirely clean, drop the bush in, straight after removing it from the freezer, knocking it home with a hammer if necessary.




Fit the new lid gasket.


Next, you need to remove the max fuel screw. People seem to be scared of this, but so long as you mark it's position in reference to the lid prior to removal there's no need to panic. Often the yellow paint is enough of a mark.


Next you need to build up the new spindle assembly. Remove the spring assembly from the old spindle and refit to the new. This procedure is pretty self explanatory, just make sure you align all the grooves and it clicks into place. Next, fit the new shim, followed by the O ring. Lubricate the O ring with a little diesel if you struggle. I ordered two just in case I broke one. Refit the entire built up spindle assembly back to the pump.

Note wear markings on the old spindle




Now, refit the lid making sure the mating faces are clean. Lubricate the inside of the bush with diesel and the new spindle should push up relatively easily. Be careful at this point not to twist or bent the spindle assembly, it will be obvious when the spindle is at the top of the bush.


Refit the max fuel screw, aligning the previous marks.

Next, you need to fill the pump with diesel, up to the brim of the return pipe exit hole. You want as little air in the pump as possible. Refit the banjo with the bolt and 2 copper washers.



Refit the spring and plastic seating. You will need to tension the spring with a screwdriver, so that the hooked end is in the right place to engage with the lug on the throttle linkage when it's located on the spindle with the lines aligned with the notch on the spindle top. Refit the spindle securing washer and nut. Re attach the throttle cable, and Bob's your real dad.

Refit the radiator and power steering pipes if removed, topping up power steering fluid if much has leaked, and start it up.

To order the correct parts for your particular pump, you will need to quote the Bosh part number on the underside of your pump. This is mine, the part number is 0 460 485 035


My van is a 1998 2.4D. These are the correct Bosch part numbers, descriptions and prices of parts needed for this pump.

1463162104 Throttle Spindle £21.18
1461015302 Lid Gasket £1.46
1460324333 Spindle Bush £8.75
1460210008 O Ring £1.30
1200101640 Shim £0.62

I bought my parts from TT Automotive in Loughborough. Great service and they do mail order. I had to have the parts sent to me in France and they were with me the same week.

www.ttauto.co.uk



Pete
Thank you so much for this. We've had great difficulty trying to source parts separately! Being told by most part sellers that Bosch stopped making in 2013and only sell the pump as a whole unit?! TTauto helped with that immediately and gave next day delivery!
1very happy camper
 

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got to say awesome post very indepth and ultra helpful,i don't think i could have found the parts if it was not for all the help on here,i just got the parts through and fixed the leaky fuel pump properly,this was the third and last time,i only replace the oring before witch worked for a month or two but came back with avengence! thanks for a awesome post guys if anyone needs any parts i have a i have a spare new bush orings shims just pm me i have a 2.4 n reg *<:)>
 

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panelbeaterpeter your a super star.

Found out mine had been sucking air back through the system when parked over night and wouldn't start next morning. Or if left all day had same issue in the evening. Van wouldn't start and you could see a big block of air in the clear pipe to the pump.

Knew i had a leak some where but did know where.
Found a work around though by pumping the diesel primer to get diesel back through the pipe to the pump, taking the air cleaner pipe off and giving it a sniff of easy start.

Had to strip the front of the van apart and actually removed the rad (Doh) to find the leak. Found it by pumping the primer and you could see diesel leaking from the throttle spindle. It was then I googled stuff and found this forum and post straight away.

Ordered all the parts from Loughborough with all the part numbers you listed.

Ordered Monday, delivered next day via UPS

All in stock and only a slight increase in price since your post but nothing major.

Followed your how to which helped immensely BUT , stupid me for got the bit about removing the washer from the throttle arm before removing the throttle arm :eek: , hence when i put it all back together on mark 2, it would idle but not rev and just cut out. moved it to mark 3 and it idled and ran, but a bit lumpy and tick over was low. put it on mark 4 (same as your pics) and it runs like a dream. A:

Very useful how to BUT for any one else doing this REMEMBER to take the washer off the throttle arm 1st and MAKE A NOTE of what mark its on.

Just wanted to add my experience and thank you for this great how to. best ever. Top man. Credit to the forum

Regards

Neil
 

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Hi PanelbeaterOz.
Im using your really helpful guide to do same on my fuel pump.
Quick question
How did you remove the radiator, where is the power steering pipe in your pics that you mention and is there any other tubes/pipes that need special treatment?

Cheers
 

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By following the excellent how to’s from panelbeaterpeter and scottyvdub and additional posts from supernube and welshrugbygod I managed to replace the throttle spindle, bush, o-ring and gasket on my 1993 1.9d. My biggest issue was getting the part number off me pump so that I could order the parts. Unlike panelbeaterpeter’s image showing the part numbers on the underside of the pump, mine looked liked this!



The bloke where I was ordering the parts from told me that he needed the 10 digit number beginning with 04! Not a chance I thought. Could see anything with the naked eye or when I used me phone camera. I was under the van for a couple of hours cleaning and the pump in the hope that the eroded part numbers would magically appear. Then I had a thought. What if I brush some sort of die on the pump, might help to make any numbers stand out. I found some food colouring in the cupboard and dabbed it on the pump. Still Nothing. My last hope was to take a photo using a better camera, by zooming in on the computer I may be able to make something out. Low and behold look what turned up! Result. Thought I’d post this in case any else was struggling with a very old pump.

 

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I have just successully followed your instructions and completed the strip out and refit of my pump on a 1992 2.4 VW T4. Cant thank you enough for postimg this, its saved me a fortune.
Few wee ot hings to add:
On my pump there was a slim spring on theninside cover so anyone with a early T4 look out for it. It doesnt really make more difficult though.

I found just putting the radiator into service position was fine.

Put a cover under your van as fuel will come out.

Use a ball end allen key 5mm to get the housing off.

If you take of the tracket that holds the rubber bit on the throttle cable make sure and put it back on before putting the throttle lever back on.

Cheers
 

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I tried this today and somehow managed to snap the piece of metal that the max fuel screw adjusts! Looks like I'm going to need a replacement pump!:( The engine won't start and I'm not getting any fuel at the injectors!
 

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hello, You must Always find the best O-rings you can at a reputable source. Don't bother trying any form of resin or sealant throughout the O-rings. Remember that the actual spindles don't actually rewrite. Instead, the rockers into the rocker boxes pivot around the actual spindle. The object with the exercise is to give food to those new O-rings gently to the rocker boxes. You can find solutions for the leakage problems in diesel pumps on http://dieselgrossisten.no/. :)
:)
 
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