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Just replaced my clattering pump, too embarrassing to ignore any longer! So here's my 'how to' on an 03 AJT engine.

Parts
Vacuum Pump 074 145 100A £225.50 + VAT Ebay £95 new from Poland - UPDATE - Failed within 2 months
Gasket 075 145 117C £5.35 + VAT *
Intermediate cam follower (drive/push rod) 074 145 307B £24.95 + VAT* note remarks end of article*

Additional Tools
13mm crow foot and flexi ractchet spanner

When to replace
The vacuum pump is known to cause a loud clattering noise, can sound like a dodgy tappet, often the noise goes when you pump the brake pedal many times or disconnect a vacuum hose leading to it. Mine was intermittent, but got gradually worse over time, Doesn't seem to cause harm if left, still performs fine and provides vacuum to brake servo and egr. There is a technical reason why diesels require a dedicated vacuum pump but will not go into that here.

Removal
Access is very restricted. The pump is located between the alternator and fuel pump and is secured by two 13mm nuts.

1. Remove belly pan
2. Remove front grille and place radiator into 'service mode'
Remove the 5 cross head screws on the grille and use special tool supplied with jack to pull front panel off it's retaining clips under headlights. Use 13mm socket to undo two bolts on the top of the radiator. Lift up radiator and pull gently towards you. The radiator should lean forward and is retained in place by it's extending arms.
3. Undo vacuum pump nuts
The top nut is accessed from above and a small 13mm socket should fit over it. The bottom nut is much harder to reach. I used a 13mm crow foot to initially turn it, then a flexi ratchet spanner to finish off. Expect a small amount of oil to leak out and once removed the drive rod should also just drop out.
4. Remove the vacuum hose
Pull the vacuum hose off the pump. It should easily slip off leaving behind a rubber sealing grommet. Remove the grommet and re-use on the new pump.
5. Refit the new pump
Wipe away any dirty oil off the housing and slide drive rod back into it's hole. Place new pump over it's studs and replace both nuts. Depending on the position of the cam, there may or may not be some tension on the drive rod as you tighten the nuts, therefore tighten nuts gradually in turn. I used a small amount of locking thread, do not overtighten or you'll damage the studs. I don't know the exact torque setting.
6. Refit vacuum hose
Push vacuum line back on and start engine. Test brake pedal then check for any oil leaks.
7. Refit radiator, front panel grille and belly pan
Push extending arms down on either side of radiator and push radiator gently back into place, tighten bolts on top to secure. Refit grille and belly pan.

* notes - I bought a rubber gasket only to find the new pump came with one anyway. Also the old drive rod had no wear, so I wasted £25 - very annoying!!! (although I would have never known this had I not bought a new rod and compared them) With hindsight I would have just bought the pump itself and nothing else. Van is now much quieter especially on idle.









 

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Discussion Starter #3
Re: Vacuum Pump replacement 2.5 TDI

Well the cheap vacuum pump I bought of ebay did not last very long. It's back to it's old tricks again, clattering away all the time. Sounds like the camshaft or tappets are worn but goes silent immediately when I remove one of the vacuum lines or pump brakes several times. I knew it was a gamble buying off evilbay but honestly can't believe it went so quickly.

Does anybody know if it's possible to repair these pumps? If not then it looks like the stealers will be getting their 250 quid after all :eek:
 

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My cheapo ebay one has also failed.
Its is leaking oil quite badly from the large circular plate at the top. Have tightened all the screws but still leaking.
 

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Hi, would just like to add an update on current prices for the vacuum pump and push rod for the 2.5 Tdi ACV 2003 engine.

Genuine VW/Audi from the dealers:

Vacuum pump & push rod......£385.74 Inc VAT:eek:

GSF:

Vacuum pump £210 Inc VAT (don't know if they do the push rod or whether the vac pump is any good!!!)

Another point to add.....my old push rod didn't look worn, but on closer inspection the end that rides the camshaft was dish shaped. Put a straight steel rule across the end of the rod and look up to the light. There will be a dish shaped gap from the wear. Mine had worn by approx. 0.4mm in the middle. My pump was also knackered and I didn't want to chance inferior parts so reluctantly went to the stealers:(
 

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If like me, when you come to do this job you can't find one of these Ratched Spanners with the elbow on the end like this:

Then dig deep in the bottom of that tool box and find an old 13mm Spanner, then using a couple of bits of bar (I used my old Rod from the Pump) and the use of a vice you can bend the end like so:



Then you can get a good fit on that awkward Bolt - pictured here from underneath T:



Hope that helps
 

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Old post but thank's for the info. I have no noises but oil leak from pump so using this guide to replace o ring. Def bending an old 13mm ring spanner top tip.
 

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I just changed mine today, Just a little note which may help someone.
If you find the cam is holding the push rod quite far out like mine was, making it difficult to fit the new pump, put a spanner or socket on the crank pulley and turn it until you find the push rod sits further in on the cam, makes life much easier
 

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I recently replaced the pump with a new one without replacing the plunger. The net result was that the new pump made almost as much noise as the old one. I pulled the cover plate off the old pump and looked at the piston and cylinder chamber and found that the piston had been tapping the body of the pump at the short end of its stroke, due to wear of the plunger end. I calculated that the chamber only has about one mm extra room over the piston stroke, so that the plunger length is critical to getting the piston to reciprocate without hitting the ends of the chamber, however I realized that you can adjust the piston position by inserting a thin washer between the shoulder on the piston pushrod and the piston. To do this you must remove the end cover plate [six torque screws], then remove the piston retaining nut. this should be done by compressing the spring in a vice so that there is no tension on the piston retaining nut. After you have removed the nut you can allow the spring to decompress by opening the vice and then the piston can be removed. The piston has a bronze ring which needs to be handled carefully to prevent damage. Now you will be able to see any witness marks that indicate if the piston has been striking the end of the chamber. If it has, just add a thin washer to the shoulder that the piston sits on, making sure that the outside diameter of the washer is less than than the hole diameter for the shaft, above the rubber seal, so that the washer doesn't strike the chamber.
Reverse the procedure to assemble the pump and reinstall. If you have got it right you should find a big reduction in noise, and there should be no reason that the pump shouldn't last a fair while longer.
Cheers
Rob
 

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Hello good, super-cheap solution here other and much better than a new Vacuum Pump and more than twice as long as the original, here at this forum we fixed for 4 €, and put the link from page 21 is the right way to do and works 100% perfect.

http://www.furgovw.org/index.php?topic=179323.300

It is to share experiences and this is a good one.

Apologize for my so bad but not english translation.

Regards.
 

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Hello good, super-cheap solution here other and much better than a new Vacuum Pump and more than twice as long as the original, here at this forum we fixed for 4 €, and put the link from page 21 is the right way to do and works 100% perfect.

http://www.furgovw.org/index.php?topic=179323.300

It is to share experiences and this is a good one.

Apologize for my so bad but not english translation.

Regards.
your english is much better than my spanish!
looks like you use a larger better seal to prevent oil seepage into the pump, nice idea, how long does it last comprendez amigo?
 

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Re: Vacuum Pump replacement 2.5 TDI

Hello, I have the solution to recover the vacuum pump. I will prepare some pictures and post here. Francisco - Brazil - [email protected]
Hi
I have same problem. I have seen pump on ebay from Germany which may well be quality for £59
But if there is away to fix one on there , I would rather do that
My email [email protected] if any pic about repairing them are up for grabs
 

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Ok am sorted now. Got a ex AA 2002 Van 200k on the clocks but runs great. Have replaced exhaust handbrake cables and change gear and engine oils.
And runs very sweet now
 
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