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hi everyone, I'm currently converting and I've gone for the locker t trim type doors, I've come across a problem of the trim not staying in the groove I make with he slotter router bit, it first starts on the corners where it pops out and that causes it to start removing on the straight edges and once it comes out it doesn't like to stay in at all. Are my corners to tight for the rubber or is my groove maybe slightly to thick for the trim, although its a slotter bit and the single lip t trim works fine.
I was wondering if anyone has come across this problem before and if they did how did they get over it.
many thanks. Craig
 

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I've had a couple of 'T' pieces come out and to be honest I used super glue to hold it back in place job done! T:
 

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HORACE
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Ive used this in that situation, put the glue on the wood(a few blobs) and spray the activator on the trim, this avoids the staining of the trim from the glue, works a treat T:
Your problem may be down to a cheaper trim, some are more flexible than others, the harder ones do seem to want to pop out of even the tightest fit, if you try to make a smaller groove and knock in a hard trim, it can sometimes split the wood.
kev
 

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It's always best to soften the trim with a hair dryer or something before fitting.
Once it's in place & cools down it should keep it's shape.
As Kev said glue is probably your best option now it's fitted.
 

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I always do corners of at least about 3cm radius. I make sure the slot is the right size by testing the cutter on a bit of scrap.

Then, most importantly in my experience, I put the trim in a bucket of really hot water for a couple of minutes before fitting it, knocking it in with a wooden mallet. The trim goes all floppy and obedient when it's warm.
 

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when you do out side corners { on the out side of doors or units} its best if you cut little vee shapes { like saw blades teeth } into the grooved part of the edgeing as this allows the inner edgeing to come together and allows the edgeing to bend better , for inner bends you dont need to do this as you be stretching the groved part of the edgeing when you put the edging on. hope this makes sence and helps.
 

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when you do out side corners { on the out side of doors or units} its best if you cut little vee shapes { like saw blades teeth } into the grooved part of the edgeing as this allows the inner edgeing to come together and allows the edgeing to bend better , for inner bends you dont need to do this as you be stretching the groved part of the edgeing when you put the edging on. hope this makes sence and helps.
You can even do a sharp 90-degree bend with this method. Just cut a divot out of the part that goes into the panel exactly where the bend is wanted.

A couple of other tips:
  • Check for run-out on the router. Mine developed serious runout so until I can get a new router I use a 2.5mm bit to get a 3mm slot. (Cut a slot in scrap, then measure it - for example use drill-bit shanks as feeler gauges.)
  • Cut the groove only just deep enough. Otherwise the groove can more easily spring open and so let the edging escape.
 

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another tip is use the proper slot cutter for t trim your using , as some cutters dont fit other make t trim and some t trim dont fit other slot cutters
 
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