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Discussion Starter #1
Alright guys. I've got the nozzles from Rake and I am going to fit them this weekend with a remap booked at ChipWizards next week. Very exciting times. Does anyone have any last-minute advice that they would like to share? Any sticking points? Any top tips?
It's an ex-AA 102-114 ACV engine and I will take some photos on post them after the successful transplant for the benefit of the next few people who embark on this journey.
Cheers - GEO
 

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Alright guys. I've got the nozzles from Rake and I am going to fit them this weekend with a remap booked at ChipWizards next week. Very exciting times. Does anyone have any last-minute advice that they would like to share? Any sticking points? Any top tips?
It's an ex-AA 102-114 ACV engine and I will take some photos on post them after the successful transplant for the benefit of the next few people who embark on this journey.
Cheers - GEO
Have you sen the PDF file available for the nozzle swap?

I got my nozzles on thursday :D Might be fitting them today as well time permitting :D
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have Mark, thanks. It's linked from Rake's PP thread & I've read it several times in preparation! Good luck with yours! Let us know how you got on.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I did the injector swap on Saturday as the first phase of PP. I have an ex-AA ACV 102-114 bhp with an intercooler already present so mine was the most basic type of operation (relative to those with 88 bhp for example). I read Davin Swanson’s pdf and Rake & Vanbling’s original PP thread over & over to make sure I was prepared. They are both excellent & very helpful. There are a few pointers that I wish I’d known beforehand which would have made it easier/ quicker – for those actual mechanics amongst you, it will probably be butter & bread stuff, but if you’re just a T4 enthusiast who’s not scared to get in amongst it then a couple of these observations might be really useful!
Access: On the 2001 Golf in Swanson’s description the nozzles seemed to point “upwards”. Ours face “forwards” toward the radiator so this needs to be dropped forwards to get at them. Remove the grille first – there’s a little plastic tool along with the jack that you slip behind the edges of the front panel which pops off its lugs after you’ve undone the five screws. Undo the obvious bolts on top of the slam plate which then lifts off the large rubber mounts. Now you can simply lift the radiator and pull it forwards. The picture shows what you should end up with.

Next you need to remove the belly pan – there are two bolts in each arch and two by the torsion bolts. It unhooks from the front by the bumper and the rear. It’s essential for access to the fuel pump and the needle lift sensor plug. If your van’s lowered you need to jack up the driver’s side to slide the belly pan out from under the front bumper. Here are the injectors viewed from above – they point forwards.

Getting to the injector clamps: I took all the braided vacuum lines off and put them to one side because it’s tricky getting at the clamps. I didn’t need to undo the glowplugs thankfully. Once you’ve cracked the fuel line nuts you can move them around loads and even remove them one at a time throughout the operation. Just remember where they go: Injector 3 goes to 12 o’clock, 1 to 9 o’clock & 2 is 6 o’clock – you’ll see.
On injector 1 – the main one – you need to undo the nut that secures the fuel return nipples from underneath so you can get at the clamp. It is crowded down there.
To undo the clamps you need an allen key attachment for a wrench because you can’t get the torque on a normal allen “key” to crack ‘em. You need an extender bar for this too and if you can clean out the hex bolt so the bit engages better than that would be great. I, rather cowboyishly, tapped the allen bit into the hex with a hammer because I just couldn’t stop it slipping.
The T4 needle lift sensor wire is threaded around the fuel pump and plugged in under the engine. It is brown and it slides out of a metal bracket.
Getting the actual clamps out: You can certainly loosen the last four with a 15mm spanner, wriggling back and forth, but I could not grip injector 1 on the flat spot with a spanner, instead having to resort to a hefty pair of mole grips. Be careful of both the plastic part of injector 1 and the fuel return port where the nipples were attached if you do this. My injectors were so seized!! At this point I was seriously worried about the prospect of having to knock them back in with a hammer!!
Rake describs annealing the sealing washers to renew the seal. I did this over the gas stove with the washer threaded over a skewer. Whilst they were cooling in the kitchen I taped a straw (a MacDonalds straw) into the end of a vacuum cleaner and hovered out the small amount of soot that lay at the bottom of each injector port – it is important to get the mating surfaces pristine for the reinstall.

Don’t worry – it was tricky up to this part and then easy thereafter. The clean nozzles slide easily back into the head (no hammering needed) and you can prevent the hex bolts slipping by cleaning them out properly and engaging the allen key in readiness.
Starting the engine: I only had to give the engine one long crank and then it started on the second attempt. Granted, it was smoky, but not too much and it only idled a tiny bit faster than usual. Already the power gain has been noticeable and it’s quite tolerable to drive in its un-mapped state. A great improvement. After a trip on the M4 before refitting the belly pan I saw no leaks. Now I am looking forward to the remap on Thursday which should straighten things out a bit and squeeze a bit more power out. I am going to ChipWizards & will post a little report in case anyone is interested.
If anyone’s got any questions before they start their nozzle swap I will gladly try to answer.
Cheers, GEO
 

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Good man Geo.

Did I not emil you my word doc ? Naughty me !#

Looks like you are flying with this in anycase.

Well done !

Goes to show that most people can do this to good effect. A:A:A:
 

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I've been reading up on this Project Power, and I am really interested in it! I've only recently bought an ex-AA T4 (102bhp 2.5tdi) and whilst it probably isn't bad for a van, it is incredibly slow compared to my "Slightly Breathed upon" fabia vRS.

Am I right in thinking that the only items that need to be purchased for this conversion on the 102bhp 2.5tdi engine, are just the injector nozzles? Or, do the injector bodies themselves need to be changed as well? My van has don just shy of 70k miles, and seems to be in excellent condition mechanically, apart from a slight rattle at idle (which I am almost certain is the vacuum pump as the noise goes away if you pump the brakes hard). Obviously there is the re-mapping costs as well.

Secondly, is this the sort of conversion that can be done by someone who has very little "spannering" experience, over the course of a weekend? I'm a bit concerned about the chances of the existing injectors being tricky to get out, and seizing. By the sounds of it, a bit of patience and care should see me through?

The only other thing I am wondering about, is the insurance implications? Does the power hike affect your premiums significantly?

Cheers
Andy
 

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I've been reading up on this Project Power, and I am really interested in it! I've only recently bought an ex-AA T4 (102bhp 2.5tdi) and whilst it probably isn't bad for a van, it is incredibly slow compared to my "Slightly Breathed upon" fabia vRS.

Am I right in thinking that the only items that need to be purchased for this conversion on the 102bhp 2.5tdi engine, are just the injector nozzles? Or, do the injector bodies themselves need to be changed as well? My van has don just shy of 70k miles, and seems to be in excellent condition mechanically, apart from a slight rattle at idle (which I am almost certain is the vacuum pump as the noise goes away if you pump the brakes hard). Obviously there is the re-mapping costs as well.

Secondly, is this the sort of conversion that can be done by someone who has very little "spannering" experience, over the course of a weekend? I'm a bit concerned about the chances of the existing injectors being tricky to get out, and seizing. By the sounds of it, a bit of patience and care should see me through?

The only other thing I am wondering about, is the insurance implications? Does the power hike affect your premiums significantly?

Cheers
Andy
Hi Andy,

The signature in ths post will lead tyou to the PP thread and should explain most things clearly.

Anyone handy with a spanner can do the mod.
Injectors are fairly easy to get out. Twist and pull action will remove them.
Using a nup on the top of the injector as something tyo pull and twwist on is the best way.
I used one of the fuel supply pipes that fit on them to achieve this.

Yes its only nozzles you need and I have 2 sets left.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yeah, Andy, I can confirm that if you read the Rake’s PP thread and the linked .pdf you’ll be fine. I read carefully and prepared well but I am not a “proper” mechanic.

So, the end of the story is that I headed up to ChipWizards on Thursday (an early start from Cardiff!). Wayne Schofield was very friendly and explained everything thoroughly, even though he has done so a million times before. It is an amazing process and has transformed my van which I finally feel is complete (well, except for fitting my clear indicators.) It’s clean as a whistle now and goes like mud off a stick. I recommend. Here are a few pictures so the rest of you know what to expect:

On the rolling road/ dyno:





ChipWizards’ setup:



By the way, in February my poor whip looked like this:



I had the painting done at Bart Motors outside Cowbridge by a guy called Stuart who was absolutely ace too – I can recommend their service to anyone in the South Wales area or beyond. He had a painstaking attention to detail and the result looks brilliant. Although the colour is quite recognisable so I have to drive nicely.
Cheers GEO
 

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Geo - She looks Brilliant.

Loving the colour, a grace to the road, well done.

Very glad you like the project power mod.

Mine has now done 80k miles and still blasting like a trooper.

Enjoy and rest assured, you'll still be loving it in years to come.

Regards.

Ron.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
150 bhp with no smoke and that is perfect for me - exactly what I expected! How did you get on with yours?
 
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