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Discussion Starter #1
i've been trying to find out about rr beds with seatbelts, and the legal requirements (tuv rated, crash tested, installation certificates etc etc) and have just called my insurers to see what they say.

according to them any rear rr bed is fine, and if i am carrying passengers i just need to get adequate seat belts installed. no mention of tuv ratings et al?

does that sound right?
 

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Hi an intresting question and somthing I to have been wondering, I have just bought a 1.9 LWB, I have two small children and want to get seat choice right! I am undecided about straight forward r&r beds or RIB/ vario tec but there seems a vast difference in price. My insurer said they were fine with alterations as long as they were to manufactures standards, how does that match to r&r's that are not crash tested?
anyone, any ideas?
 

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I guess it all comes down to: Would you trust something "unknown" with your loved ones?

I think the RIB is the only approved one by TUV standards etc.

RR beds are usually just bolted to the floor via the 4 rearmost lashing points. It holds it into position but in a crash would they be strong enough? What is the shearing force against the 4 bolts? would the seat come crushing forwards into the cab?

Regardless of insurance, I think it all comes down to what you are happy to live with. I've taken a gamble and have a RR bed, its simple and cheap- I don't take rear passengers.

If I had the money then it would be an approved bed....maybe one day!
 

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i wouldnt trust a single word an insurance company say would always ask for it to be put in writting as confirmation as they have an amazing skill in the event of a claim to deny all phone calls.

I have run a car audio shop for the last twenty years and lost count how many times some poor person has lost all there kit only to be told that the person who told them it was covered turns out it wasnt
 

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Why are you asking about TUV?

you dont live in Germany?

TUV is the German equivilent to BSI or the 'kite mark' when goods are made, and the MOT for vehicles. It is much stricter for vehicles, even down to you have to get the vehicle ok'd if you change brand of tyres fitted!

The only reason that people go on so much about TUV with VW's is that they are a german vehicle and it is mentioned on lots of paperwork.

It has no legal standing in this country, except that it is an indication that the goods are fit for purpose.

Providing that the seatbelts are properly fitted and not held in by very small bolts or black gaffer tape you should be ok for the insurance purposes. eg has it passed an MOT since they were fitted and did they include those seats as seats on the MOT papaerwork?

"RR beds are usually just bolted to the floor via the 4 rearmost lashing points. It holds it into position but in a crash would they be strong enough? What is the shearing force against the 4 bolts? would the seat come crushing forwards into the cab?" How many bolts hold your front seat and seatbelt in/on? most car rear seats pivot and only have one bolt at each end of the seatbelt.


From a safety point of view, all fixings, TUv, MOT or whatever all have a failing point..... just dont reach it.................



The biggest safety measure is to tighten the one with the loose screw on the seat just behind the steering wheel....LOL:
 

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anybody else got any feelings on this? i'm at the stage now where i'm looking for a bed and will need seat belts in the rear anybody suggest a good supplier that supply with belts
(not lap belts) i think a good point was made about how many bolts hold down seat belts in cars etc and there is normally just 2
whats the thoughts because there is a vast difference between the rib bed price and normal r&r, do the rib get fixed down to the van in the same way as r&r?
 

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Just to add a little clarity to the strength of bolts argument. I'm a mechanical engineer and we regularly put together bolted connections. Firstly we carry out very basic stress analysis to ensure that it is safe. As an example figure the force required to break a grade 8.8 M10 bolt is somewhere around 6 tons, now think about four of them working together. Although in a crash you will experience significant decelleration this would need to be in the region of 60 G's before the bolts would snap.

In short it's unlikely that a correctly installed bolt will fail. It's far more likely that it's mounting poin in the van will rip out. This is why spredder plates are used to reduce this risk.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
'This is why spredder plates are used to reduce this risk.'

so in terms of a rr bed and how it is fitted to the van, what would be preferable - a canons forge bed that bolts into the lashing points or a bluebird that is bolted through the floor with spreader plates underneath?
 

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I belive that if you put a spreader plate on the underside, then if the force was that stong to break the spreader plate through the floor then you would be talking of a very hard shunt and you would be lucky to be alive even if the seat belt and bed kept you in place anyway.

If you can afford £2k on a crash tested bed then buy one, But i am very happy with my steel framed bed with 3 point belts with good quailty plates on the underside of the floor with 6 m10 bolts at the rear and 1 at the front.

I would sit in the above bed, and so does my son. In a perfect world we would all buy califonias from vw, But we aint all got that kinda cash.:(

We can also drive more slowly I:
 

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Very good thread this..

I am too an Engineer and I have looked long and hard into the bedsituation I have just bought an Auto's Bed for a number of reason, one being that it is fully welded and only painted. This is because when it arrives I will looking to make sure it is secure enough for what I am looking for. If I have to add more to it I will.

The backing plates I normaly go over the top when i do this, THis means it's a hell of a force to pull.

Now when You look at cars and suppliers of seat belts even for race rally cars the backing plate is a 2" by 1" plate.. this is their standard I have just welded in plates for a 1954 Porsche that are 3.5" by 3.5" I am more than happy with this over the standard 2x1.
 
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