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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,
This little post is how I managed to get my passenger door open to remove the broken lock which, helpfully, managed to break while the door was closed and deadbolted, just to spite me. I am not saying this is the best way to approach the matter but this is how I achieved my goal… I did have pictures to accompany this narrative however, ‘twas during this adventure that my phone died taking all my pictures to some digital next life so, apologies for that.
As the title suggests, I had been having problems with the passenger door on my 07 plate T5 unlocking whenever it felt like it, which was not often to be honest. Usually, I found that pressing the lock/unlock button on the driver’s door repeatedly usually led to the door unlocking and being of the lazy persuasion, I was happy to live like that. It did mean that filling up the van took more forethought to avoid the somewhat time-consuming issue of getting to the filler cap but, again, I was happy to live like that. Then the MOT came round and ‘twas time to sort the issue out. I dually sat down and did the research which seemed to point to the connection under the driver’s chair. Easy thought I and so the next morn, out came the driver’s chair, out came the dustpan and brush, out came more filth than I care to admit, out came the razor blade, off came the tip of the forefinger and finally, off came the sticky abomination that was the tape concealing the wiring only to reveal a pristine connection without a hint of corrosion; “bol***ks” thought I.
So, while leaving sticky finger prints along most surfaces I came into contact with, ‘twas back to the ole ‘puter for a bit more research, closely followed by a drink-inducing panic. Many more people were having the same problem as me and I was not finding any quick route to unlocking the door so I could get the lock out. After crossing out the connection under the driver’s seat, all that I was left with was that the lock was broken, possibly the electrical side of things. I shall be the first to admit that I am not gifted with brain power and I could not come up with a sequence of words strung together in any meaningful way that would make ole Google understand my predicament and therefore provide a meaningful answer. So, with a handful of webpages open, each with a (hopefully) meaningful morsal contained within, ‘twas back down to the van. This is how the battle unfolded….
So, firstly, to get more room, you will need to remove the passenger seat. I have a two-seater bench contraption so after finally figuring out how to pop open the seat, undo the nuts and the spline screws holding onto the electrics and then remove the seat (Out went the seat, in came the dustpan and brush once more and out came I coughing and spluttering with the amount of dust under there).
Now you have to remove the lower portion of trim down the side pillar. First off, remove the spline bolt holding the lower portion of the seatbelt and then all I did was tug the lower plastic trim off. I broke a load of white plastic connectors but the trim piece will come off eventually.
Next, you have to remove the footwell sidestep. The key to this is really just brute force and ignorance (the former I lack but am gifted with an abundance of the latter). The plastic is (thankfully) thick and robust and will flex so with a bit of tugging (and a triumphal roar at the end), I got the bast**d out. Again, I was left with a multitude of dead plastic connectors but I am sure, if you are more persuasive that I, your casualty count will be less than mine.
If you have one (I do but it is neatly thrown in a pile of items labelled “to replace in the future”), pop off the plastic trim of the pull handle and use a cross-headed screwdriver to under to the two screws holding the handle backing in. I found you will need to use a small flat-bladed screwdriver to lift two small tabs within each screw hole to release the handle-backing out. Next, you will need a small spline/hex (no idea of the name of the instrument but you will see what I mean when you look at the head of the screw) to remove a screw in the centre of the door card, roughly half way down. There are also three more of the little bast**ds hiding at the bottom of the door card and so you will need to feel under the door card in the footwell and remove them as well.
Next, I tapped (hit) the underside of the door card upwards until it slid a bit and then, with a bit of tugging, profanity and at the cost of yet more broken plastic clips, the door card came away. Now, before being too hasty to move the door card somewhere less intrusive than the confines of the passenger footwell like me, have a quick look on the back of the door card and you will see a small connector leading to the electric window switch which needs to be unclipped and a steel cable sheathed in black heading to the inner door handle which needs to be unclipped from the back of the handle and then twisted to be released. Take care with the plastic clip on the cable as they are fragile apparently however, I somehow managed not break this one which is a bit of a relief. Lift the door card over the lock button and it should come away now (and be flung into the recesses of the rear of the van with another triumphal roar).
Righto, now you should see a steal panel with the window motor and speaker bolted onto it. Roughly in the middle of the panel are two circular black rubber grommets/bungs that you can pull off letting you view the internals of the door. Drop the passenger window down about a quarter of the way and you will see two 10mm bolts lining up with the holes. Slacken these off and then drop the window down almost to the bottom of the door, once there, pull the window free of the mechanism and manoeuvre out of the door making sure to put it somewhere flat or safe. Now, there are a number of bolts going around the outside of the steel panel so just undo these and then, gently, pull the panel off the door. There is a weather strip going around the panel which needed pealing off so gently does it. With the panel now slack and hanging from the door, pull it into the van enough to get your hand behind it and follow the electric cables running to the lock in the upper left-hand area of the door. Unclip the wire from the lock (or if you are like me, tug, push, pull, wiggle and keep running through this sequence and once you have tickled the van enough, it will release-I have no idea how they clip on or off and it was this procedure that got me through it). Once done, pull the panel into the van and feed the interior handle cable through the hole in the top left of the panel. I then just put the panel off to one side by the dash. Now you should be able to stick your head partially into the door and see the monstrosity that is causing you all this grief. To save yourself the trouble, I pulled the interior door handle cable multiple times, adjusted the lock button on the top, pulled the outside and inside handles at the same time and nothing worked. As you now look at the lock in the door, you might be able to see it is made of two sections with two wires connecting the two at the bottom. As I figure it, the section you can see extending towards you and aligned lengthways with the van is the electrical portion of the lock; the bit behind that is the mechanical section and the bit you need to get to. My thought at this point was that electrics in vans have no place and we should go back to a time when things were purely mechanical.
Right, now you can get your favourite drill with associated drill bit. I drilled a big enough hole in the bottom of the nearest piece of plastic on the door that I could see. I read about this on some website somewhere on the interweb which said that if you break away the bottom portion of the plastic casing, you will see a cog (which I did) and you need to twist that cog anticlockwise until you feel some resistance (which I did) and then keep twisting and the door should open (which it didn’t). I even twisted it back to point of resistance and then tried the outside door handle and interior cable, both to no avail. Bug**r.
At this point, it was time for a new lock so 20 minutes on Fleabay and I had ordered said new lock. Back to the bast**d still stuck in the door. Time for more brute force and ignorance. Using a couple of long screwdrivers, I was able to break the plastic housing for the electrical portion of the lock and after a bit more puffing/panting/screaming at the damned thing, I finally managed to bend it down towards the bottom of the van and out of the way. After all that exertion, the triumphal roar was more of a gasp. Now you can shove your head back into the door void and, with a light, have a look at the back of the mechanical part of the lock. In the upper third you should see two metal triangular hooks, grab your favourite wrecking screwdriver, put the blade against the hooks and push the hooks towards the inside of the van. With a satisfying clunk, the door unlocked, swung open and deposited me head first onto the driveway as I still had my noggin firmly within the door void. This roar of triumph was a muted groan as I tried to extract my legs from within the van as I was forced into an involuntary push-up. With the door now open, you will see on the back edge of the door an oblong rubber grommet, pop that out and you will then see another spline headed screw buried in the guts of the door. Unscrew this while also wiggling and tugging the plastic trim piece beside the outside door handle (where the keyhole is on the driver’s side) and it will pop out without having to unscrew the screw the whole way. Have a look at the outside door handle and you will a metal wire with a small plastic rectangular head on it attached to the handle. Pop this off and that will free the lock from the handle.
Now you can unscrew the two spline bolts holding the lock in the door and remove the damned thing. Depending on the lock and associated bits and pieces you have purchased, you may need to take off the internal lock button that pops up and down on the door trim, the internal door handle cable and the small cable for the external door handle. Put these to one side before throwing the lock into the pile of useless junk destined for the local recycling centre and grabbing a well-earned pint or three.
Refitting is the reverse of removal without the aches and contortions you had to go through to get the damned piece out now that the door is open. Once the nice bloke from DPD gave me the replacement lock, I had it in the van with all the pieces back on (a little looser than before due to the masses of plastic trim things I managed to break along the way) within an hour or so.
And here ends the tale of the dead-bolted door and my victory over it in the end. If anyone cares to walk this path, I wish you well and be prepared by buying as many plastic trim pieces as you can.
Good luck.
 

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Hi,
So I have just overcome the same issue but I wanted to offer my solution to undoing the deadlocked passenger door.
Having watched many videos and read many threads the realisation of following the above sounded like a terrible weekend. One of the many youtube videos identified which electrical pins the central locking loom under your drivers seat locked and unlocked the passenger door. Using this information I rigged up a variable DC power supply and starting with 12V applied the voltage, only applying for a second or 2. I increased the voltage in 1 volt increments, still applying for just a second or 2 at a time. This is to try to avoid burning out any electrical components as I was very quickly exceeding the normal running voltage of the van.
At 19.5 V I heard movement in the door. I opted to apply the power for a longer duration at this point rather than increase the voltage any further. Bingo, the door unlocked.
Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello drtux20,
Your method sounded infinitely better and quicker than mine. Glad that your ingenuity prevailed and adding to the page for others!
Cheers!
 
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