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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

Anyone know if the are any issues with the Automatic boxes fitted to the 2.5 130 T5.

I have just bought a LWB Shuttle with 100k on the clock , with Full VW Service history.

I would expect the engine to last gallactic space miles with correct maintenance but am a bit concerned as to the longevity of the auto box.

What would it be reasonable to expect from the box ?

Is there any specific maintenance that I should follow apart from ensuring the box oil is correctly topped up etc.

I am about to get it converted so would like some reassurance about the life of the box.

Thanks
 

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Does the TRIPRONIC have the same arrangement as those in GM vehicles, ie there is an auto mode or you can select UP or Down by shifting the lever in a manual mode?
Not sure what the VW uses but if its a ZF manufacture gearbox then these are pretty good but after 100 K I would expect some issues to crop up?
How many speeds does it have??
A:A:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi,

I think its called the DSG.

It has 6 speed auto and 6 speed manual option.

For auto simply selet D for drive.

Manual gears are selected by pulling the selector to one side then forward and back to select higher or lower gears.

Its a really clever superb box and I am really pleased with it but if anything is going to go its going to be expensive because that sort of engineering and electronics doesnt come cheap.

There must be many of them out there fitted to other peoples vehicles.I would think that the box is probably also used in other models including 2.5 audi tdi's etc

Please do scare me unecessarily though.Unless you have experience, (good or bad ) with this particular gearbox I would rather no reply than speculation.

Is there anyone out there with this box that has experienced high miles.

Thanks
 

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It's not a DSG, that's the gearbox with the double clutch. The gearbox is made by Aisin which is part of Toyota. It's a 6 speed and works as mentioned before.

The model seems to be the TF-60SN. I got this from the Aisin site:

TF-60SN (Lightweight and compact-size achieved by a sophisticated gear train arrangement. *Based on Lepelletier system)
NEW BEETLE CABRIOLET, GOLF, JETTA, MULTI-VAN, PASSAT, GOLF PLUS (VOLKSWAGEN), POLO, TOURAN (VOLKSWAGEN / SHANGHAI VOLKSWAGEN), TT, A3 (AUDI), ALTEA, TOLEDO (SEAT), MINI-COOPER S(BMW), OCTAVIA (ŠKODA)


My beef with VW is that they refuse to change the AFT saying it's a sealed for life unit, which
will mean that it's life will be severely shortened.

At the moment my Tiptronic is working fine and I like it a lot.h
 

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HI,I have this automatic with 171.000kms on now, All going well, I cannot find any information on how to change the atf, obviously it will not last forever,
 

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If you have an auto. Change the ATF periodically.
Vw say "filled for life", and that is true.
It's just that the life of the trans will be longer if you change the ATF.
My personal reccomendation is to change it at circa 80k miles.
If you are in any doubt, just check the colour of the oil in your transmission with some new stuff.
Pop a drop of each onto a clean white tissue. The difference is startling.

If your ATF is brownish - it needs to be changed.

Safest way is to use a vacuum oil extractor, and pull it out of the dipstick tube.
Make sure everything you use is spotlessly clean.
And use only a fluid that has the EXACT spec on it.
I reccomend vw fluid.

You won't be able to change all the fluid - you cannot drain the torque converter.
But you will be able to partially change it.

A good policy is to do a partial change every 30k miles, changing approx half the fluid.
But if it is particularly dark brown, do a few changes to clear as much of the old oil out.
 

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If you have an auto. Change the ATF periodically.
Vw say "filled for life", and that is true.
It's just that the life of the trans will be longer if you change the ATF.
My personal reccomendation is to change it at circa 80k miles.
If you are in any doubt, just check the colour of the oil in your transmission with some new stuff.
Pop a drop of each onto a clean white tissue. The difference is startling.

If your ATF is brownish - it needs to be changed.

Safest way is to use a vacuum oil extractor, and pull it out of the dipstick tube.
Make sure everything you use is spotlessly clean.
And use only a fluid that has the EXACT spec on it.
I reccomend vw fluid.

You won't be able to change all the fluid - you cannot drain the torque converter.
But you will be able to partially change it.

A good policy is to do a partial change every 30k miles, changing approx half the fluid.
But if it is particularly dark brown, do a few changes to clear as much of the old oil out.
Good advice T:
Oil change is a must do ,at 100k its over due alot !!!!! Should be filter too somewhere ??
 

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Safest way is to use a vacuum oil extractor, and pull it out of the dipstick tube.
Make sure everything you use is spotlessly clean.
And use only a fluid that has the EXACT spec on it.
I reccomend vw fluid.

You won't be able to change all the fluid - you cannot drain the torque converter.
But you will be able to partially change it.
What about the filter in the sump pan?
 

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I'm not sure the 6- speed has one that can be serviced.
The earlier 5-speed fitted to gm's and saabs doesn't.
I'll look it up when I get home.
 

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Hi, Thank you all for the information. My t5 is 2006 year, I cannot find any dipstick? For the automatic transmission.
 

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Hi, Thank you all for the information. My t5 is 2006 year, I cannot find any dipstick? For the automatic transmission.
Thats because it doesn't have dipstick.

And around 2006 they did away with the filler tube as well!


If your still interested in changing the fluid I can tell you how but it a messy job as you have to fill it through the drain/level bung.
 

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I've just bought an auto 130 with 84k on it - long life history from Vw ! Coming straight off that , it's gone in for a full service with ATF change too , and a water pump as I had 2 go on my t4 ! Drives sweet , I wasn't sure about the auto but I'm loving it so far - there's loads of horror stories ... But you can find horror stories on any engine / gearbox if you look hard enough. There's 1000's out there that are running with mega miles that have been properly looked after . ...Just enjoy the ride !
 

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I'm new to T5s but the Tiptronic boxes Audi used to use were pretty good (same as BMW of that era). Unfortunately they changed about 2000 to CTF boxes based on the old DAF system of opposing sized cones but with a chain drive. These ere absolute lemons - read the forums...

I know the DSG is different & may have sorted all the problems out.

The advice on the Audi / VW forums was tro change the 'sealed for life' CTF fluid enery 20K. Opie oils do the correct spec in a Fuchs oil. The Audis had to be filled from underneath using a special filler tool OR as I set up a gravity feed bottle tube system - transfusion like. The temp had to be critical to get the correct level which was best done with a VCDS - although in the early days I used a digital thermometer stuck on to the sump....

This may OR may not be the same as the later DSG boxes.
 

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I'm new to T5s but the Tiptronic boxes Audi used to use were pretty good (same as BMW of that era). Unfortunately they changed about 2000 to CTF boxes based on the old DAF system of opposing sized cones but with a chain drive. These ere absolute lemons - read the forums...
This information is wrong.

Audi carried on using the tiptronic along side the multitronic gearbox.
Multitronic gearboxes have a 40K oil change interval and also use a dual mass flywheel with the gearbox.
Tiptronic gearboxes are seal of life. (Personally I would still change the oil and filter every 40K)
 

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yes i've read horror stories about the multitronic but yours wont be that

my ex passat v6 tdi (2002) was fitted with the tiptronic auto and it was no bother at all, and that was remapped from 150 to 180 bhp

yes it can used in auto mode or tip tronic selection

dsg is lovely, best auto i've driven but scary if goes wrong, think this is only an option from 2010 onwards with the 2.0tdi variants


a 2.5tdi with tip tronic wouldnt put me off but i'd deffo get all the oils changed so you know its good to go :)
 

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Actually, while the 7-speed DSG initially seems a bit of a nightmare - its actually a bit simpler than the 6-speed auto.

The 6-speed has a really complex set of hydraulic clutches and bands and three(?) epicyclic gear sets and some fancy one way clutches - AND a torque converter - and a load of shift solenoids - all that need to be fed with scrupulously clean ATF all the time.
I've worked with loads of autos ( on the electronics ) and it's never failed to amaze me how they work at all. When yu take one apart - its scary whats in there.

The seven speed is, in essence a manual gearbox that is controlled by electronics.
Actually, it's two gearboxes, off the same central shaft ( hence the DSG - for Dual Shaft Gearbox from memory)
There are two wet clutches that put the power through one of the gearboxes.
When it changes gear, it changes over the clutches, thus effectively changing gear by changing the gearshift in use.
The electronics will select the next gear on the other shaft.

There are no fancy sprag clutches or multiple clutches on a shaft that are so sensitive to dirt in the oil. No madly complex hydraulic, and no torque converter.
In mechanical terms, the actual gear selection mechanics is the same as a manual - synchro cones - very reliable - especially when shifted sympathetically by the electronic control.
The only bit that can cause any trouble is the clutch - the 7-speed does actually have a clutch ( actually two clutches) rather than a torque converter, so you shouldn't hold the van on a hill using the throttle like you would on a normal auto. When you do - you are spinning the clutch - and it will overheat if you keep doing it.

The electronics could cause trouble, but this should be a bit simpler to diagnose and fix - whereas the traditional autos can be a bit of a black art....

The 7- speed does seem to be holding up. Not heared of any big trouble really.

But I'd still change the ATF regularly.
 

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Actually, while the 7-speed DSG initially seems a bit of a nightmare - its actually a bit simpler than the 6-speed auto.

The 6-speed has a really complex set of hydraulic clutches and bands and three(?) epicyclic gear sets and some fancy one way clutches - AND a torque converter - and a load of shift solenoids - all that need to be fed with scrupulously clean ATF all the time.
I've worked with loads of autos ( on the electronics ) and it's never failed to amaze me how they work at all. When yu take one apart - its scary whats in there.

The seven speed is, in essence a manual gearbox that is controlled by electronics.
Actually, it's two gearboxes, off the same central shaft ( hence the DSG - for Dual Shaft Gearbox from memory)
There are two wet clutches that put the power through one of the gearboxes.
When it changes gear, it changes over the clutches, thus effectively changing gear by changing the gearshift in use.
The electronics will select the next gear on the other shaft.

There are no fancy sprag clutches or multiple clutches on a shaft that are so sensitive to dirt in the oil. No madly complex hydraulic, and no torque converter.
In mechanical terms, the actual gear selection mechanics is the same as a manual - synchro cones - very reliable - especially when shifted sympathetically by the electronic control.
The only bit that can cause any trouble is the clutch - the 7-speed does actually have a clutch ( actually two clutches) rather than a torque converter, so you shouldn't hold the van on a hill using the throttle like you would on a normal auto. When you do - you are spinning the clutch - and it will overheat if you keep doing it.

The electronics could cause trouble, but this should be a bit simpler to diagnose and fix - whereas the traditional autos can be a bit of a black art....

The 7- speed does seem to be holding up. Not heared of any big trouble really.

But I'd still change the ATF regularly.
This info is all wrong again!!!!! :confused:

DSG = Direct shift gearbox

DSG gearboxes are an automated manual gearbox - both 6/7 speed (so there NO torque converter or epicyclic gear sets)

With the 6 speed DSG geabox the clutches run inside the gearbox in the oil (wet clutch) because the clutches run in the oil that why they have a oil filter and a 40K oil change intival

The 7 speed uses a standard dry plate clutches.

For more info read up on Wikipedia
 
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